Year One Courses – D.M.D. Program

Fall

Winter

Summer

Biochemistry                                                                                        

  • Course Number: 887
  • Credits (Weight): 2.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)

Course Goals and Objectives

The course is designed to provide an understanding of the biochemical basis of physiological processes.  While the emphasis is on functional and regulatory aspects, a solid knowledge of the structure of major biological substances and of enzymatic reactions is required to have a clear understanding of how biochemical reactions determine physiological function and regulation.  The course is concerned primarily with the biochemical basis of normal processes, but examples of disease states are used to show how specific biochemical defects can lead to illness.

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Dental Anatomy/CFF I

  • Course Number:  885
  • Credits (Weight): 2.0 (Theory), 1.0 (Project)
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester:  Fall (Sept-Dec)

Course Goals and Objectives

The goal in Dental Anatomy and Cranio-facial Function1 is for the student to acquire basic knowledge about the morphology of teeth in the human dentitions and knowledge of how the shape, form, structure and function of the teeth as they relate to each other. The study of Dental Anatomy, Physiology and Occlusion/ Cranio-facial Function, provides the basic skills needed to practice dentistry. Specific Objectives include:

  • Be able to use common Dental Anatomy terminology.
  • Be able to identify and locate gross anatomic structures of the oral cavity.
  • Acquire a detailed knowledge of the morphology of each tooth in the primary and permanent dentitions.
  • Be able to identify characteristics in tooth form and how they relate to tooth function
  • Be able to identify tooth type and arch location of an extracted natural tooth.
  • Understand the relationship between tooth morphology and clinical dentistry.
  • Master the static occlusal contact relationship of an idealized, normal Class IOcclusion (cusp tip to marginal ridge occlusal scheme).
  • Be able to identify the gross anatomic structures of the temporomandibu lar joint (bones, ligaments, muscles, other soft tissues) and relate these structures to the function of the jaws.
  • Be able understand border movements of the mandible in the sagittal, frontal, and horizontal planes.
  • Be able to distinguish the tracings made by the condyle·during mandibular movements in horizontal and vertical planes.
  • Be able to identify the pathway of any cusp as it moves across the surface of a tooth in the opposing arch during protrusive, retrusive and lateral excursive movements.
  • Be able to describe the gliding tooth contacts that are made in an idealized, normal Class I Occlusion possessing anterior group f unction ,canine guidance, posterior group function, or a bilaterally balanced type occlusion.
  • Understand how variables of occlusion among patients affect the restoration of a posterior tooth.
  • Begin to become familiar with the use of the semi-adjustable articulator and understand its limitations when reproducing patient variables of occlusion.
  • Develop technical skills by creating wax-ups, which are both anatomically and functionally correct.
  • Posterior Functional Wax-up on the Articulator
  • Computer Preclinical Simulation Examination

Self-Assessment

The evaluation of your preclinical Dental Anatomy course will be divided into three distinct areas: cognitive skills, projects, and professionalism (a portion of your professionalism assessment will depend on how well you care for our preclinical facility.  Any abuse of the laboratory will be reported to the Ethics, Professionalism, and Citizenship Committee.

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Ethics and Professionalism

  • Course Number: 893
  • Credits (Weight): 1.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)

Course Goals and Objectives

The Ethics and Professionalism course is designed to provide students with a foundation upon which to develop ethical decision-making skills.  The questions of what one should do and why one should do it are central to ethical decision-making, and permeate into nearly all components of dentists’ personal and professional lives.

The class is intended to elevate ethical and professional responsibility, promote ethical conduct in the classroom, in the clinic, and in the dental profession.  The class is intended to stimulate debate on important ethical issues and not merely solve particular ethical dilemmas.  While the object of ethics is to emphasize spirit or intent rather than law, the class will introduce a legal perspective to many ethical situations.  While the rules of law and ethical standards are often in harmony, one question students must answer, for example, is how does one handle scenarios when ethical principles are contrary to law?

The class is intended to challenge students’ conventional thinking on a variety of issues pertaining to the practice of dentistry, while promoting an ethical perspective to the students’ decision-making processes.

society and benefit (or not benefit) from its distributed resources refers to the concept of social justice.

Ultimately, this analysis turns toward the treatment of patients.  Are all patients entitled to dental care, do all have access to care, and if so, is such care adequate?  Are like cases treated alike?  If not, what differences exist that dictate “unequal” care?  Gender, religious, sexual orientation, and race discriminations are clear and obvious ethical violations.  However, what about the issue of wealth disparity between patients?  Are patients without the ability to pay for dental services justly denied such services?  Are the refusal to place patients on payment plans to ease financial burdens unethical?  What role does and should the government play in the dentist-patient relationship?

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Gross Anatomy (Including Embryology)

  • Course Number: 137
  • Credits (Weight): 4.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)

Course Goals and Objectives

This course is part of the dental student’s competency-based education. The goal of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of the gross (dissectible) structures of the human body, particularly of the head and neck region and to relate this knowledge to the practice of dentistry. Commonly encountered clinical conditions are also discussed.

As a pre-clinical course, the students are expected to be competent in the following general areas in addition to the specific knowledge associated with Gross Anatomy:

  • Information Management and Critical Thinking: Students will learn to acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  • Professionalism: Demonstrate ethical and professional conduct in the course, especially in respect to the body donors.
  • Communication and Interpersonal Skills: From day one of the course, students will be working with other students  as colleagues. Team work is paramount and they need to develop good communication and interpersonal skills. Proficiency in these areas will serve them well when them move on to the clinics.
  • Life-long Learning: As science and dental medicine are constantly evolving, a competent dental professional is engaged in a life-long learning process.

By the end of the course, the student shall learn the relationship of the grossly dissectible structures of the human body, with special emphasis in the head and neck regions; begin to understand how anatomical knowledge is applied to clinical diagnostic problem solving; develop professional relationships with faculty and fellow students and appreciate the value of team work.

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Nutrition

  • Course Number: 845
  • Credits (Weight): 1.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)

The goals of the course entitled Science of Nutrition are as follows:

  • To provide the student with a strong foundation in the science of nutrition as it affects general health and well being.
  • To provide the student with an understanding of how nutrition can affect the development of oral tissues and structures and how dietary and nutritional factors can promote or undermine oral health.

The objectives for the Science of Nutrition course:

  • Delineate the basic nutritional requirements for a sound diet to promote health.
  • Explain the functions, human requirements and food sources of the nutrients covered.
  • Describe the effects of diet and nutrition on the development and continuing health status of hard and soft oral tissues.
  • Explain the role of nutrition in common degenerative diseases as well as how dietary modifications can prevent or ameliorate these conditions.
  • List the major nutritional issues of pregnant women, children, adults and the elderly
  • Describe the criteria by which professionals can evaluate nutritional claims to determine their validity, and refute some common nutrition misconceptions.

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Operative Dentistry-Patient Simulation

  • Course Number: 998
  • Credits (Weight): 2.0 (Practical), 1.0 (Theory), 1.0 (Project)
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Fall/Winter (Sep-May)

Course Goals and Objectives

The theoretical (didactic) portion and the technical (practical) phases of the course will guide you in reaching an acceptable level of competency by doing the following: ability to communicate in the area of operative dentistry which requires a vocabulary that is based on the mastery of the nomenclature and terminology involved in describing the performance of these restorative procedures; introduce students to the instruments, terminology, and basic principles of operative dentistry; provide instruction on composite resin placement/finish/polish and then amalgam preparations and restorations; provide the essential skills needed to perform true basic restorative procedures which are essential to successful entry into the performance of clinical operative dentistry; treat caries, manipulate selected materials and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

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Histology

  • Course Number: 30
  • Credits (Weight): 4.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)

Course Goals and Objectives

Histology (also known as Cell, Tissue & Organ Biology) is the study of form and function of cells, tissues, and organs at the microscopic level.  Lecture and laboratory sessions stress the relationships between structural composition and function,

and relate microscopic anatomy to other biological/biomedical disciplines.  Information is derived from light and electron microscopy, histochemistry, cell and molecular biology, and biological chemistry.  Some important methodologies, together with their limitations, are also presented.  Integrated into this course is an essential block of sessions devoted to the special

topics of oral histology and tooth development.  Finally, in anticipation of courses in pathology (general and oral), which at the microscopic level represents abnormal histology, some important clinical correlations are introduced.

The overall objectives of this course are as follows:  1) to develop the concept of the inseparable relationship of form and function;  2) to provide adequate perspective and preparation in order to integrate the knowledge of cells, tissues, and organs in the scheme of other basic and clinical biomedical sciences–especially pathology (general and oral) and physiology; and  3) to demonstrate that histology is an approach to the study of the human body, a strategy which can assist in strengthening the powers of critical observation, problem solving, diagnostic reasoning, and judgment.

Information Management and Critical Thinking

Graduates must be able to acquire, integrate and apply information in a critical and scientific manner to assist in evidence-based patient care, using information technology where applicable.

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Medicine I

  • Course Number: 399
  • Credits: 2.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)

Course Goals and Objectives

Medical/Dental History & Physical Examination on a “Normal” & “Medically Complex” patient; basic knowledge ofThe “Highest Priority” illnesses and symptoms and signs of associated disease states; basic understanding of commonlaboratory tests needed for diagnosing and assessing disease states; apply disease & laboratory tests knowledge towardscase assessments; have thorough knowledge of Anesthetics, Analgesics, Antibiotics, and apply the knowledge towards caseassessment and management; have basic knowledge of abuse, intimate partner violence, TMD & sleep disorders plus applythis knowledge towards patient assessment during History & Physical examination; details of Prescription writing and abilityto write a Prescription for Antibiotics.

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Microbiology/Oral Health Promotion

  • Course Number: 890
  • Credits (Weight): 2.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)

Course Goals and Objectives: Microbiology

To present the basic essentials of microbiology in order to understand the role of microorganisms in health and disease and in the ecology of the oral cavity; to present the basic science of dental caries and inflammatory periodontal diseases, so that the student will be able to understand the principles upon which current and future methods of caries and periodontal disease prevention, control and treatment are based.

Course Goals and Objectives: Oral Health Promotion

To provide the student with an understanding of the etiology and prevalence of common oral diseases and conditions; to provide the student with information on materials and techniques which can help patients to prevent oral disease and promote oral health.

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Physiology

  • Course Number: 864
  • Credits (Weight): 3.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Winter/Summer (Jan-May)

Course Goals and Objectives

This course covers the functions of mammalian organisms as we understand them at variouslevels of organization – organ system, organ, cellular and subcellular levels. Our goal is toprovide a working knowledge of the fundamental properties and regulation of these systems sothat the student can understand and relate this material to that learned in other basic sciencecourses and to the practice of clinical dentistry. The course is designed to emphasize thoseaspects of physiology that are of fundamental importance to the maintenance of oral health andthe recognition of oral disease while, at the same time, providing a comprehensive background inall areas of physiology.

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Practice Management I

  • Course Number: 1148
  • Credits (Weight): 1.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Winter/Summer (Mar-May)

Course Goals and Objectives

The practice management curriculum will provide the student with understanding of personal insurances as well as insurances that are specifically needed by dental practice owners. Basic personal finances and specific finances for a dental practice will be studied and discussed. Legal and regulatory issues for dentists and dental practices are specified and reviewed. Labor laws, hiring, reviewing, and termination of employees are presented along with team building and creating a culture in a dental practice. Concepts of doctor patient relationship, internal marketing, and communication with patients are discussed. Dental reimbursement plans (insurance) are described.  Career options, interviewing, contracts, and entering your first job are covered. Specifics of evaluation and purchase of a dental practice plus leadership of the dental team are discussed in interactive small group seminars.

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Basic Human Pathology

  • Course Number: 31
  • Credits (Weight): 2.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Summer (Apr-June)

Course Goals and Objectives

The primary educational goals are: at the completion of general pathology, the dental student will demonstrate knowledge of the terminology of pathology and understand the processes of cellular tissue injury, environmental pathologies, developmental disorders, inflammation and repair mechanisms, neoplastic disturbances and tumors, and hemodynamic disorders. Know the types and specific features of diseases covered in the course that can affect the following systems of the human body:

  • Cardiovascular
  • Respiratory
  • Upper aerodigestive tract (Nose, pharynx, larynx and esophagus)
  • Gastrointestinal
  • Hepatic and biliary tract (including hepatitis and diabetes mellitus)
  • Nervous
  • Urinary
  • Gynecological and obstetrics
  • Breast disease
  • Male genital system

Note: The Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology course will cover oral soft tissue lesions, bone and rheumatological diseases; certain nose and throat conditions; hematological and lymphatic diseases; endocrine diseases; systemic diseases with oral manifestations; and dermatologic conditions with oral findings or involvement.

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Immunology

  • Course Number: 867
  • Credits (Weight): 1.0
  • Predoctoral Year: Year 1
  • Semester: Summer (Apr-June)

Course Goals and Objectives

The goal of the Immunology course is to have students learn, use, and integrate the concepts of immunology in a manner that fosters long-term retention of basic principles and vocabulary.  Upon completion of the course, students should be able to read and understand articles that involve immune processes (e.g. inflammation) in the context of clinical issues important to dental medicine.  Students are encouraged to develop an approach to diagnosis and treatment that includes an understanding of the mechanisms underlying a medical condition, especially the frequent involvement of immunological factors in a patient’s medical history.

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