Public Health and Community-Service Courses

CPR Training – Year 2 & 4
Community Service Learning Externship Forum
Community Service Learning Externship
Epidemiology Course
Epidemiology Library Workshop
Geriatric Dentistry Course
Geriatric Dentistry Rotation
Medicine I & II Courses
Medicine III Rotation
Microbiology/Oral Health Promotion Course
Nutrition Course
Oral Health Promotion/Nutrition Seminar
Special Care Rotation

Course Name: Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Training – Year 2
Course Number: 1235
Credits: 0
Course Director: Dr. Kanchan Ganda
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Monday, Tuesday, Friday 4: 30-7pm;Wednesday, Thursday 5-7pm/Merritt Auditorium
Text(s): The AHA Healthcare Provider on-line CPR Certification Textbook which accompanies the on-line exam.

Grading & Evaluation:

The CPR certification is a 2-component certification: Written exam and a hands-on training session.

For the written exam portion, the student is required to complete the didactic training with the new online training course. The online training must be completed prior to the manikin training.

The written exam website is accessed from any computer, and the exam can be completed at the student’s convenience. The exam does not have to be completed all in one sitting. The program will remember at which point the left off previously.

The student obtains his/her individual Key Code number from the Department Administrator, Patty DiAngelis’ office, to access the online exam. Once the student has passed the exam, the student has to print their completion certificate and hand it over to Patty DiAngelis.

The 4th year students are scheduled for the hands-on CPR certification during a week in the fall, by the academic Dean’s office. The schedule contains the date the student is assigned to take the manikin portion of the exam. The written part of the exam has to be completed prior to this date.

The CPR card cannot be issued until the student has completed the online training course, passed the exam, turned in their completion certificate and completed the manikin part. TUSDM supports the cost of the Key Codes.

CPR cards thus obtained are good for two years.

Remediation:

Online exam failures are given 2 extra chances to retake the exam before they are locked out. Once locked out, the candidate has to review the material and take the AHA hard copy test which is provided by Dr. Ganda’s office.

Mannequin failures are retrained by the CPR instructors and their skills honed till successful completion of the hands-on training.

What changes have been made to your course since last year?

The written and hands-on sessions were all completed in the classroom setting previously. We now have switched to the online exam and have freed up the time to devote extra attention to the hands-on training sessions.

Course Goal:

The goal of the course is to prepare the student to perform CPR competently, in all types of clinical settings.

Course Objectives:

  1. The student will understand the principles of CPR and will demonstrate the knowledge of all the steps required for successful outcome.
  2. The student will identify and appropriately deal with adverse situations encountered during CPR implementation.
  3. The student will identify alterations in steps needed to successfully implement and complete CPR in adults, children and infants.

Course/Lecture Schedule: Scheduled as part of the ICE program by the academic Dean’s office.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#7. Manage oral (pupal, periodontal or traumatic) or medical emergencies including performing CPR and activating local life support systems (EMS) and/or make appropriate referrals to medical and dental specialties.

Course Name: Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Training – Year 4
Course Number: 1235
Credits: 0
Course Director: Dr. Kanchan Ganda
Predoctoral Year: 4
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Monday & Tuesday 4: 30-7pm, Merritt Auditorium
Text(s): The AHA Healthcare Provider on-line CPR Certification Textbook which accompanies the on-line exam.

Grading & Evaluation:

The CPR certification is a 2-component certification: Written exam and a hands-on training session.

For the written exam portion, the student is required to complete the didactic training with the new online training course. The online training must be completed prior to the manikin training.

The written exam website is accessed from any computer, and the exam can be completed at the student’s convenience. The exam does not have to be completed all in one sitting. The program will remember at which point the left off previously.

The student obtains his/her individual Key Code number from the Department Administrator, Patty DiAngelis’ office, to access the online exam. Once the student has passed the exam, the student has to print their completion certificate and hand it over to Patty DiAngelis.

The 4th year students are scheduled for the hands-on CPR certification during a week in the fall, by the academic Dean’s office. The schedule contains the date the student is assigned to take the manikin portion of the exam. The written part of the exam has to be completed PRIOR to this date.

The CPR card cannot be issued until the student has completed the online training course, passed the exam, turned in their completion certificate and completed the manikin part. TUSDM supports the cost of the Key Codes.

CPR cards thus obtained are good for two years.

Remediation:

Online exam failures are given 2 extra chances to retake the exam before they are locked out. Once locked out, the candidate has to review the material and take the AHA hard copy test which is provided by Dr. Ganda’s office.

Mannequin failures are retrained by the CPR instructors and their skills honed till successful completion of the hands-on training.

What changes have been made to your course since last year?

The written and hands-on sessions were all completed in the classroom setting previously. We now have switched to the online exam and have freed up the time to devote extra attention to the hands-on training sessions.

Course Goal:

The goal of the course is to prepare the student to perform CPR competently, in all types of clinical settings.

Course Objectives:

  1. The student will understand the principles of CPR and will demonstrate the knowledge of all the steps required for successful outcome.
  2. The student will identify and appropriately deal with adverse situations encountered during CPR implementation.
  3. The student will identify alterations in steps needed to successfully implement and complete CPR in adults, children and infants.

Course/Lecture Schedule: Scheduled as part of the ICE program by the academic Dean’s office.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#7. Manage oral (pupal, periodontal or traumatic) or medical emergencies including performing CPR and activating local life support systems (EMS) and/or make appropriate referrals to medical and dental specialties.

Course Name: Community Service Learning Externship
Course Number: 9981
Credits: 4
Course Director: Dr. Cynthia Yered McLaughlin
Predoctoral Year: 3(Summer)/ 4
Semester: Summer (May-August, of Year 3) Fall (Sept-Dec), Winter (Jan-April)
Time & Location: M-F, 9-4pm, Externship Clinics

Course Name: Epidemiology
Course Number: 884
Credits: 1
Course Director: Dr. Wanda Wright
Predorctoral Year: 2
Semester: Fall (Oct.-Dec.)
Time & Location: Tu 10: 30am-12pm – Posner Auditorium

Course Name: Geriatric Course
Course Number: 898
Credits: 1
Course Director: Dr. Hilde Tillman
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Summer (May-August)
Time & Location: W 8-8: 45am Merritt

Course Name: Geriatric Seminar/Rotation
Course Number:
1203
Credits (Weight): 0
Course Director: Dr. Hilde Tillman
Predoctoral Year: 3
Semester: Fall (Sept – Dec); Winter (Jan-April)
Time & Location: Tues 1 – 4pm – Room 739; Thurs: 12:45 – 2:30pm – Off-site

Course Goals:

The goal of the geriatric seminar/rotation is to study the scope of medical problems, review medications as they affect dental management, present psychosocial and environmental factors in relation to dental management, and differentiate normal or usual aging affected by disease. We will also assess the relationship of chronological and physiological age.  Adjustment to chronic diseases, physical disabilities, mental changes, sensory deficits. Off-site rotation goals include teach prevention and perform oral health screening, blood pressure screening and cancer screening for diverse social and ethnic populations in a variety of settings: subsidized housing, assisted living sites, senior centers, churches, homeless shelters and senior day care centers in the Greater Boston area. Transportation is provided by the City of Boston, Division of Elder Affairs.

Course Objectives:

  1. Demographics:
    1. Name, Age, Living Status, and Ethnicity.
  2. Medical History:
    1. Medical Findings, nutritional status, functional status assess disabilities in relation to activities of daily living (Barthel Index), and instrumental activities of daily living
  3. Mental Status:
    1. Assess cognition: long term and short term memory. Signs of depression, signs of dementia, behavioral changes.
  4. Medications:
    1. Dosage, side effects, interactions and the affect on dental management.
  5. Oral Health Status:
    1. Chief complaint, oral findings, patient’s expectations, and treatment plan.
  6. Impacts:
    1. Impact of Medical, psychosocial, mental, physical, and financial statuses on restoration of oral health and maintenance of oral health.

Course Name: Medicine I
Course Number:
399
Credits (Weight): 2
Course Director: Dr. Kanchan Ganda
Predoctoral Year: 1
Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Mon 9-10:30am; Weds 9-10:30am – Merritt Auditorium

Required Text:

  • Dentist’s Guide to Medical Conditions & Complications, K. Ganda
  • Wiley-Blackwell Publishers

Recommended Reading:

  • A Guide to Physical Examination & History Taking, Barbara Bates; J. B. Lippincott Co., Publishers
  • The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy; Robert Berkow, M.D., Editor-in-Chief. Published by Merck Research Laboratories.

Grading & Evaluation:

1st exam: 50% of the final grade
2nd exam: 50% of the final grade

Course Goal:

  • To have the ability to do a complete medical history & physical examination on patients
  • To have a basic understanding of the “Highest Priority Illnesses”
  • To know the common symptoms and signs associated with the “highest priority illnesses”
  • To have a good understanding of some of the common drugs encountered in dentistry
  • To be competent at Prescription Writing

Course Objectives:

  • Determine patient’s chief complaint & elicit a chronological account of the patient’s problem
  • Obtain and evaluate significant aspects of the patient’s prior medical history and experience
  • Elicit a personal, social and family history from the patient
  • Determine and record the psychological and behavioral status of the patient
  • Perform a systemic and complete exam of the head and neck area, chest, and extremities
  • Have thorough knowledge of antibiotics, anti-viral & anti-fungal drugs used in dentistry
  • Learn how to modifying the clinical management of these cases in the dental setting for optimal outcome.
  • To ultimately empower the student with appropriate clinical knowledge for successful transition from the preclinical to the clinical setting.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course:

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#7. Manage oral (pupal, periodontal or traumatic) or medical emergencies including performing CPR and activating local life support systems (EMS) and/or make appropriate referrals to medical and dental specialties.

#8. Identify and provide effective local anesthesia for oral treatment.

#9. Identify and prescribe appropriate pharmacological agents, including noting any potential drug interactions related to dental treatment for pain, anxiety, prevention, infection, inflammation, surgical complications and conditions related to dental treatment.

#10. Understand general anesthesia, nitrous oxide, conscious sedations and the use of non-pharmacological techniques to manage anxiety.

#11. Communicate and demonstrate to patients the importance of home care procedures and the need for a re-care program. Apply the concepts of quality assurance in evaluating the results of dental treatment at re-care.

Course Name: Medicine II
Course Number:
412
Credits (Weight): 3
Course Director: Dr. Kanchan Ganda
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Fall (Sept – Dec); Winter (Jan-April)
Time & Location: Tues 2:30-4pm/1-3pm; Thurs 1-4:30pm – Merritt Auditorium

Required Material:

  • Powerpoint speaker slides posted on TUSK under Medicine IIA & IIB
  • Ganda, K. Dentist’s Guide to Medical Conditions & Complications.Wiley-Blackwell, USA
  • Lecture content notes & lecture capture

Recommended Reading:

  • The Merck Manual
  • Kelly, William. N. Kelley’s Essentials of Internal Medicine.Lippincott, USA

Grading & Evaluation:

1st exam: 40% of the final grade
2nd exam: 30% of the final grade
3rd exam: 30% of the final grade

Course Goal:

The student should be able to evaluate systemic health conditions, medications plus associated problems and appropriately apply the knowledge towards patient care, in a future clinical setting.

Course Objectives:

  • To recognize the clinical presentation of common systemic conditions and frequently occurring medical emergencies.
  • To understand the physical evaluation and medical therapeutics for treatment of common systemic conditions.
  • To recognize and interpret common clinical laboratory tests used to evaluate specific disease states and to identify the need for further investigation.
  • To appreciate concepts of medical management and suggested modifications during dentistry.
  • Participate in clinical case study analysis of the medically compromised dental patient presenting with, laboratory tests, medications and specific physical findings. The student will learn how to modifying the clinical management of these cases in the dental setting for optimal outcome.
  • To ultimately empower the student with appropriate clinical knowledge for successful transition from the preclinical to the clinical setting.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course:

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#7. Manage oral (pupal, periodontal or traumatic) or medical emergencies including performing CPR and activating local life support systems (EMS) and/or make appropriate referrals to medical and dental specialities.

#8. Identify and provide effective local anesthesia for oral treatment.

#9. Identify and prescribe appropriate pharmacological agents, including noting any potential drug interactions related to dental treatment for pain, anxiety, prevention, infection, inflammation, surgical complications and conditions related to dental treatment.

#10. Understand general anesthesia, nitrous oxide, conscious sedations and the use of non-pharmacological techniques to manage anxiety.

#11. Communicate and demonstrate to patients the importance of home care procedures and the need for a re-care program. Apply the concepts of quality assurance in evaluating the results of dental treatment at re-care.

#12. Perform risk assessment, determine etiology of dental disease, communicate and demonstrate to patient approaches to modify behaviors contributing to dental disease.

#16. Manage and treat localized odontogenic infections and common operative and postoperative surgical complications.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

#26. Understand the requirements for infections control and risk management.

Course Name: Medicine III Rotation
Course Number: 418
Credits: 2
Course Director:
Dr. Kanchan Ganda
Predoctoral Year: 3
Semester: Fall/ Winter Semesters, Sept-April
Time & Location: Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 1-4pm; Thursday: 9-12pm. DHS-773 and 770
Text(s): Reading materials posted to TUSK each semester
Grading & Evaluation: Attendance and competency exams

Course Goals:

  • To discuss the evaluation of disease states in the medically complex patients (MCP), including laboratory tests and medications, differential diagnosis, the final diagnosis, the medical management and concerns when encountered in the dental setting.
  • To confidently provide all forms of dental care needed by the MCP patient.

Course Objectives:

The student will be able to:

  • Apply the medical knowledge gained during the Medicine III rotations to evaluate disease states encountered in the dental setting.
  • Assess the status of the medical condition(s) during history taking; assess presence/absence of disease associated oral findings, evaluate radiographs and determine disease associated dental changes, plus what is/are the patient’s dental needs.
  • Modify the treatment plan and the sequencing of dental care, to accommodate the MCP’s current medical status.
  • Appropriately modify the use of anesthetics, analgesics, antibiotics to match the patient’s vital organ status.
  • Refer the medically complex patient to the PCP/specialty physician when needed, to help better control the medical condition(s), when determined to be out of range to proceed with care in the dental setting.

Course Name: Microbiology/Oral Health Promotion
Course Number: 890
Credits: 2
Course Director: Dr. Carole Palmer
Predoctoral Year: 1
Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Tuesday 9-10: 15am; Thursday 1-2: 15pm

Text(s): Harris & Christen: Harris, N., & Christen, A., eds. Primary Preventive Dentistry, 6th edition. Appleton and Lange, 1995 (Available in Bookstore and on Reserve in Library).

Grading & Evaluation: Test 1 quiz= 20%, Test 2 Midterm= 40%, Test 3 Final =40% (not cumulative)

Course Goals:

Microbiology:

  1. To present the basic essentials of microbiology in order to understand the role of microorganisms in health and disease and in the ecology of the oral cavity.
  2. To present the basic science of dental caries and inflammatory periodontal diseases, so that the student will be able to understand the principles upon which current and future methods of caries and periodontal disease prevention, control and treatment are based

Oral Health Promotion

  1. To provide the student with an understanding of the etiology and prevalence of common oral diseases and conditions.
  2. To provide the student with information on materials and techniques which can help patients to prevent oral disease and promote oral health.

Course Objectives:

Microbiology:

The student will be able to:

  1. Understand the common language of microbiology and recognize the special features of microscopic life forms.
  2. Recognize the structural and biochemical features that distinguish bacteria from higher organisms.
  3. Recognize the unique aspects of microbial growth and the aspects of bacterial metabolism that are important in disease.
  4. Identify and characterize the principal microorganisms found in the oral cavity.
  5. Describe the beneficial and harmful aspects of the oral flora, the ecology of the oral cavity the nature of biofilms and the role of biofilms in oral and systemic diseases.
  6. Describe the factors that affect the establishment and growth of bacteria in the oral cavity.
  7. Describe the multiple factors that are necessary for dental caries initiation and the role of saliva in caries prevention and control.
  8. Describe dental plaque and the mechanisms involved in its formation and attachment to teeth and describe methods of dental plaque control.
  9. Describe the effects of various food factors, especially refined carbohydrates, on the development and progression of dental caries.
  10. Describe the clinical appearance of dental caries and the criteria to categorize all stages and types of dental caries.
  11. Describe the microstructural, ultrastructural and chemical changes observed in dental caries.
  12. Describe the various properties that make bacteria cariogenic.
  13. Describe the periodontal flora and the etiologic factors affecting periodontal disease pathogenesis.
  14. Overview the microbiological basis for current clinical dental infection control polices and procedures.
  15. Introduce the phenomenon and pathogenicity of prions and their impact on the practice of clinical dentistry.
  16. Introduce the concept of bioterrorism and the role of the dental profession in response to bioterrorism incidents

Oral Health Promotion:

  1. Describe the etiology and development of caries and periodontal disease.
  2. Recommend appropriate clinical and patient home care techniques and materials to enable the patient to prevent caries and periodontal disease and to promote optimum oral health.
  3. Describe mechanical and chemical methods of dental plaque control and the indications for use of each method.
  4. Differentiate between systemic and topical fluoride utilization, describe the mechanisms of action of fluoride and the indications and contraindications for use of each fluoride modality.
  5. Describe the processes of demineralization and remineralization of tooth structure and the strategies, which may be used to enhance the process of remineralization.
  6. Discuss water fluoridation: its history, beneficial effects and toxicity and the current viable alternatives to community water fluoridation.
  7. Understand and identify the oral pathologic consequences of all types of tobacco use and the role of the dental professional in tobacco control and cessation.
  8. Describe the role of diet and nutrition in promoting oral health.
  9. Describe and utilize techniques of effective counseling to enhance patient compliance with oral hygiene and dietary recommendations.
  10. Identify barriers inherent with group communication and discuss techniques of effective group education and motivation.
  11. Identify underserved dental patient populations and discuss the role of the dentist in community oral health programs and access to care.
  12. Understand the strategies and methods of the clinical utilization of pit and fissure sealants.
  13. Describe the principles of preventive dentistry as applied to dental patients with disabilities.
  14. Introduce students to the concept of dental patient risk assessment and risk management in the control of preventable oral and dental diseases and disabilities.
  15. Introduction of the concept of evidence-based dentistry and its application to clinical decision making in the practice of dentistry.
  16. Identify the relationship between oral health and systemic health.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#9. Identify and prescribe appropriate pharmacological agents, including noting any potential drug interactions related to dental treatment for pain, anxiety, prevention, infection, inflammation, surgical complications and conditions related to dental treatment.

#11. Communicate and demonstrate to patients the importance of home care procedures and the need for a re-care program. Apply the concepts of quality assurance in evaluating the results of dental treatment at re-care.

#12. Perform risk assessment, determine etiology of dental disease, communicate and demonstrate to patient approaches to modify behaviors contributing to dental disease.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

Course Name: Nutrition
Course Number: 845
Credits: 1
Course Director: Dr. Carole Palmer
Predoctoral Year: 1
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Monday 2-3pm; Tuesday 10-11am; Friday 1-3pm

Text(s): Palmer, C, ed. Diet and Nutrition in Oral Health, 2nd. edition, Upper Saddle River NJ, Prentice Hall, 2007

Grading & Evaluation:

Examinations will be based upon text, readings, and lectures. There will be 2 examinations and may be quizzes as well.

Midterm Exam 1 is worth 40 % of total grade, Final exam is worth 50% of total grade, Homework and any quizzes are worth 10%.

Course Goal:

  • To provide the student with a strong foundation in the science of nutrition as it affects general health and well being
  • To provide the student with an understanding of how nutrition can affect the development of oral tissues and structures and how dietary and nutritional factors can promote or undermine oral health.

Course Objectives:

After completing the course, the student should be able to:

  1. Delineate the basic nutritional requirements for a sound diet to promote health.
  2. Explain the functions, human requirements and food sources of the nutrients covered.
  3. Describe the effects of diet and nutrition on the development and continuing health status of hard and soft oral tissues.
  4. Explain the role of nutrition in common degenerative diseases as well as how dietary modifications can prevent or ameliorate these conditions.
  5. List the major nutritional issues of pregnant women, children, adults and the elderly
  6. Describe the criteria by which professionals can evaluate nutritional claims to determine their validity, and refute some common nutrition misconceptions.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#9. Identify and prescribe appropriate pharmacological agents, including noting any potential drug interactions related to dental treatment for pain, anxiety, prevention, infection, inflammation, surgical complications and conditions related to dental treatment.

#12. Perform risk assessment, determine etiology of dental disease, communicate and demonstrate to patient approaches to modify behaviors contributing to dental disease.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

Course Name: Oral Health Promotion/Nutrition Seminar
Course Number: 1292
Credits: 0
Course Director:
Dr. Carole Palmer, Ms. Theresa Brennan
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Summer (May-Aug)
Time & Location: Wednesday 1-4pm, D738
Grading & Evaluation:
Attendance

Course Goals:

To provide students with an understanding of the:

  • Oral health implications of patients with special health care needs
  • Nutritional issues commonly confronted in general practice.

To increase students’ ability to diagnose and manage the oral health and nutritional concerns of patients with:

  • Special needs
  • Diabetes
  • Oral cancer
  • Side effects of aging

Course Objectives:

After participating in the OHP/Nutrition seminar, the student will be able to:

  • Discuss common oral problems of patients with special health care needs
  • Prescribe the appropriate oral health interventions to overcome these problems
  • Discuss the types of nutritional implications of common life situations and medical condition (e.g., aging, diabetes, cancer)
  • Discuss the dental practice implications of these considerations
  • Be able to offer dental-dietary advice and management consistent with accepted practice for these patients.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#11. Communicate and demonstrate to patients the importance of home care procedures and the need for a re-care program. Apply the concepts of quality assurance in evaluating the results of dental treatment at re-care.

#12. Perform risk assessment, determine etiology of dental disease, communicate and demonstrate to patient approaches to modify behaviors contributing to dental disease.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

Course Name: Special Care Rotation
Course Number: 1343
Credits:
Course Director:
Dr. Darren Drag, Dr. Dawn West (co-course director)
Predoctoral Year:
4
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec), Winter (Jan-Apr)

Time & Location: One week for each student @ one of three Special Care sites.

Text(s):
Special Care Module/Manual – on TUSK.

Grading & Evaluation:

Competency Examination.

Course Goals and Objectives:

  1. Learn firsthand about some of the experiences and strong perceptions held by persons with disabilities.
  2. Discover how the legal rights, and accompanying philosophical changes, have positively affected the ways in which persons with disabilities now live.
  3. Gain an overview of the purposes and practices of someorganizations serving the dental needs of persons with disabilities in the community.
  4. Identify critical barriers to dental care in the special needs population

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course are bolded:

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.