Prosthodontics and Operative Courses

CranioFacial Function II Course
CranioFacial Function III Course
Dental Anatomy/Craniofacial Function
Endodontic/Fixed Prostho Simulated Patient Workshop
Fixed Prosthodontics – Patient Simulation Course
Form for Function and Wax-up Workshop
Implant Dentistry Patient Simulation Course
Interdisciplinary Seminar
Operative Dentistry Patient Simulation Course
Operative Workshop (Intro to Clinical Materials)
Operative Prep Workshop
Pindex Workshop
Porcelain Esthetic Dentistry Workshop
Post Workshop
Postgraduate Prosthodontics Rotation
Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry Course
Prosthodontics/Esthetics Seminar
Removable Prosthodontics Patient Simulation Course Course Name: CranioFacial Function II
Course Number: 1355, 5023
Credits (Weight): 1, 1
Course Director: Dr. Robert Chapman
Predoctoral Year: 1, 2
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Mondays 1-4pm, DHS 8
Grading & Evaluation:Pass, fail, honors. Based on attendance and a final examination

Course Goal

To encourage students to correlate information provided in the first and second years and apply it to Craniofacial Function (CFF), Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQOL), and leadership.

Course Objectives

At each session, appropriate information from course lectures, laboratories, and Patient Simulation exercises will be discussed and correlated by faculty with participation by students.

The student will be able to:

  1. Understand how basic sciences correlate with clinical sciences
  2. Understand how and be able to solve problems as groups.
  3. Understand the basics of Leadership.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

Course Name: Craniofacial Function III
Course Number:
1002
Credits: 1
Course Director: Dr. Luis Del Castillo
Predoctoral Year:3
Semester:Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Tuesday & Thursday 8-8:45am
Recommended Text(s): PE Dawson. Functional occlusion from TMJ to smile design, Mosby, 2007
Grading & Evaluation: 50% – Mid-term Written Examination
50% – Final Written Examination
Remediation: Tutors are available through student affairs. Remediation course is available for those who fail the course.

Course Goal

The goal of the course is to enable students to attain a comprehensive understanding of:

  1. Functions and dysfunctions of the craniofacial system
  2. Incorporation of optimal occlusal concepts into all aspect of oral health care

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:

  1. Recognize a stable craniofacial system and dental occlusion
  2. Identify problems associated with unstable or pathologic craniofacial complex and dental occlusion
  3. Define anterior, posterior and neuromuscular determinants of dental occlusion
  4. Understand interrelationship between mastication, speech and esthetics
  5. Identify clinical significance of occlusal vertical dimension and occlusal plane
  6. Apply basic principles of occlusion for the management of fixed and removable prosthodontic procedures
  7. Discuss how to examine and diagnose temporomandibular disorders
  8. Fabricate appropriate occlusal devices

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#17. Understand how to fabricate and use removable appliances, space maintainer, and lingual arches.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

Course Name: Dental Anatomy/Craniofacial Function
Course Number:
885
Credits: 2(Theory) 1 (Practice)
Course Director: Dr. Luis Del Castillo, Dr. Joanne Falzone (co-course director)
Predoctoral Year:
1
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Tuesday & Thursday 1-4:30pm, DHS 8
Text(s):

1. Wheeler’s Dental Anatomy, Physiology and Occlusion
Major M. Ash, Jr. and Stanley J. Nelson; Eighth Edition, W.B. Saunders Company, 2003 (required reading).

2. Wheeler’s Dental Anatomy, Physiology and Occlusion, CD ROM (required viewing)

3. Deciduous Dentition Review, JM Falzone and ME Gonzalez CD ROM (required viewing)

4. Management of Temporomandibular Disorders and Occlusion
J.P. Okeson, Sixth edition, C.V. Mosby Company, 2007 (exceptional reference; required reading)

5. Selected Articles from the Dental Literature, For a more indepth understanding of lecture material (Optional Reading).

Grading & Evaluation: A Doctor of Dental Medicine degree requires competence in both cognitive and technical skills. In addition, it is expected that the highest level of ethical and moral standards be up-held to earn a DMD degree and become a member of our noble profession. For these reasons, the evaluation of your preclinical Dental Anatomy course will be divided into three distinct areas:

1. Cognitive Skills

2. Technical Skills

3. Professional Attitude and Habits

It is essential, in order for you to successfully complete the course, to pass both cognitive and technical areas individually. A separate grade for each area will appear on your transcript.

Professional attitude and habits will be evaluated and recorded. Any serious breach in professional or ethical behavior will be reported to the Ethics Committee. Additionally, exemplary professional attitude and habits will be recorded.

Remediation: Students are offered one-on-one tutorial assistance with the associate course director twice per week before classes begin during the course itself. When a student fails dental anatomy, he/she is offered individual tutorial assistance for aspects of the course content for which there are questions. A re-exam is offered to students who fail the course at the discretion of the Promotions Committee.

What changes have been made to your course since last year?

  1. Added two video tapes to demonstrate how to complete a wax-up on the specimens used in the course. (Authors: Falzone/Gonzales)
  2. Added a comprehensive Powerpoint Presentation to TUSK a comprehensive review of the deciduous dentition (Authors: Falzone/Gonzales)
  3. Added experimental evidence showing demineralization of enamel with acid.
  4. Increased emphasis of identifying a patient’s dental age utilizing clinical images and radiographs.
  5. Increased emphasis on the relationship of a patient’s variables of occlusion and its effect on a restoration that is made on an articulator.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#13. Perform scaling, root planning and surgical access procedures when necessary.

#14. Perform non-surgical root canal treatment on uncomplicated single and multi-rooted teeth.

#15. Perform uncomplicated extractions of teeth and root tips and minor pre-prosthetic surgical procedures, including those requiring uncomplicated flap procedures.

#17. Understand how to fabricate and use removable appliances, space maintainer, and lingual arches.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

Course Goal

  • The goal in dental anatomy is for you to acquire basic cognitive and technical skills in the areas of tooth form and tooth function of the primary and permanent dentitions in order to prepare you for more complex clinically relevant dental courses.
  • To encourage students to correlate information provided in the first and second years and apply it to Craniofacial Function (CFF), Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQOL), and leadership.

Course Objectives

By the end of the course, the student will:

  1. Be familiar with and able to use common dental anatomy terminology.
  2. Be able to identify and locate gross anatomic structures of the oral cavity.
  3. Acquire a detailed knowledge of the morphology of each tooth in the primary and permanent dentitions.
  4. Be able to identify subtle morphologic characteristics of each tooth and understand how these characteristics in tooth form relate to tooth function (self-protective features of the dentition).
  5. Be able to examine a typical extracted natural tooth and identify it according to tooth type and arch location.
  6. Begin to appreciate the relationship between tooth morphology and clinical dentistry.
  7. Master the static occlusal contact relationship of an idealized, normal I occlusion (cusp tip to marginal ridge occlusal scheme).
  8. Be able to identify the gross anatomic structures of the temporomandibular joint (bones, ligaments, muscles, other soft tissues) and relate these structures to the function of the jaws.
  9. Be able to draw border movements of the mandible, as seen in the sagittal, frontal, and horizontal planes.
  10. Be able to draw panographic tracings made by the movement of the condyle in the mandibular fossa during protrusive and lateral movements of the mandible (horizontal and vertical planes).
  11. Be able to draw the pathway of any cusp as it moves across the surface of a tooth in the opposing arch for protrusion, retrusion, right and left lateral excursions.
    1. Be able to describe the gliding tooth contacts that are made in an idealized, normal Class I occlusion possessing anterior group function, canine guidance, posterior group function, or a bilaterally balanced type occlusion.
    2. Understand how variables of occlusion among patients affect the restoration of a posterior tooth.
  12. Begin to become familiar with the use of the semi-adjustable articulator and understand its limitations when reproducing patient variables of occlusion.
  13. Develop technical skills by creating wax-ups, which are both anatomically esthetic and functionally correct.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#13. Perform scaling, root planning and surgical access procedures when necessary.

#14. Perform non-surgical root canal treatment on uncomplicated single and multi-rooted teeth.

#15. Perform uncomplicated extractions of teeth and root tips and minor pre-prosthetic surgical procedures, including those requiring uncomplicated flap procedures.

#17. Understand how to fabricate and use removable appliances, space maintainer, and lingual arches.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

More goals and objectives:

The student will be able to:

  1. Understand how basic sciences correlate with clinical sciences
  2. Understand how and be able to solve problems as groups.
  3. Understand the basics of Leadership

Course Name: Endodontic Fixed Prostho Simulated Patient Workshop
Course Number:
1221
Credits:
Course Director:
Dr. Ekaterini Antonellou, Dr. Charles Rankin
Predoctoral Year:
3
Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Friday 8am-4pm, DHS 8

Course Goal/Objective

The goal/objective of this workshop is to prepare students to perform the NERB licensing examination and to review the principles of Fixed prosthodontics and endodontics.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#14. Perform non-surgical root canal treatment on uncomplicated single and multi-rooted teeth.

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Fixed Prosthodontics – Patient Simulation
Course Number:
895
Credits (Weight):
1 (Theory) 2 (Practical) 1 (Project)
Course Director:
Dr. Ekaterini Antonellou
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec), Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: M 1-4pm/4:30-7pm; W 1-4pm/4:30-7pm
Text(s): Shillingberg Fundamentals of Fixed Prosthodontics, 3rd Edition. Quintessence, 1997.

Grading & Evaluation

91 and above = Honors

70 and above = Passing

69 and below = Failing

Theory grade: The theory grade is a numerical average of the grades you receive on 3 written examinations. Written examinations are cumulative with emphasis on recently covered material. Technical grade: The technical grade is a numerical grade based on technical performance on the practical examinations. Practical examinations are evaluated as ideal, acceptable or unacceptable.

Remediation: If the Student Promotion Committee recommends remediation of any portion of the course, remedial sessions will be set up to meet the requirements for reexamination as required. Remediation and reexamination will be held during the summer.

Course Goal

  • The goal of the course is to prepare the student for the complex task of performing fixed prosthodontic procedures on a clinical level.
  • This course is designed to provide a background knowledge of biomaterials science and technology relevant to dentistry. It will consist of a series of lectures on dental biomaterials: their structure, physico-chemical and mechanical properties, applications in dentistry, advantages and disadvantages and material evaluation and selection.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:

  1. Understand the principles and demonstrate knowledge of the instruments and dental materials required to perform fixed prosthodontic procedures.
  2. Identify and properly deal with hazardous situations, devices, and situations encountered in restorative dental practice.
  3. Make alginate impressions, pour and trim the stone casts.
  4. Mount the study casts on a semi-adjustable articulator using the facebow and an interocclusal bite registration.
  5. Fabricate a diagnostic wax up, which incorporates proper form, function and esthetics.
  6. Prepare abutment teeth for a posterior fixed partial denture consisting of two abutments and a single pontic.
  7. Fabricate an acrylic temporary fixed partial denture.
  8. Make a custom acrylic impression tray for use with elastic impression materials.
  9. Fabricate a master cast with removable dies and mount it on a semi-adjustable articulator.
  10. Wax, invest, cast, solder and polish a three-unit fixed partial denture.
  11. Prepare an endodontically treated tooth for a cast post and core and fabricate a direct resin pattern for a post and core.
  12. Prepare a posterior mutlirooted endodontically treated tooth for a parapost and amalgam core; cement paraposts in the prepared tooth.
  13. Prepare an anterior tooth for a porcelain-fused-to-metal restoration.
  14. Wax, invest and cast an anterior restoration and apply, contour, stain and glaze the porcelain veneer.
  15. Prepare and restore an endodontically treated abutment.
  16. Prepare teeth for porcelain veneers.)

At the end of the course, the students are expected to also have a background of biomaterials science relevant to dentistry which will enable them to:

  1. Describe the principal properties of major biomaterials used in dentistry
  2. Have an overview of currently available dental biomaterials and their applications
  3. Have the ability to relate the properties of the materials to clinical technique and efficacy
  4. Have knowledge of the general composition of materials
  5. Have the ability to use the basic knowledge acquired from this course to critical thinking in the use of materials on patients clinical care

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by course

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Form for Function and Wax-up Workshop
Course Number:
5033
Credits:
0
Course Director: Dr.
Hiroshi Hirayama
Predoctoral Year:
3
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Tuesday 5-7pm, D248

Course Goal/Objective

The Goal of this workshop is to review wax-up techniques for occlusal form and function.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#20. Manage simple implant procedures.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Implant Dentistry
Course Number: 1293
Credits: 2
Course Director: Dr. Ali Muftu
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Summer (May-Aug)
Time & Location: Tuesday 8am – 12pm

Additional Resources:

Predoctoral Implant Dentistry Wiki

Grading & Evaluation

20% Quiz

40% Examination I (Midterm)

40% Examination II (Final)

Remediation Tutors are available through Student Affairs. A remediation course is available for those who fail the course.

Course Goals and Objectives

The student will be able to:

  1. Have an understanding of the history of implant dentistry,
  2. Learn the scientific basis of implant-host relations and interactions.
  3. Learn how to include implants in diagnosis and treatment planning.
  4. Be familiar with basic surgical implant placement techniques
  5. Learn about limitations and complications of implants
  6. Be able to identify the level of difficulty of implant treatment, which might need care of a specialist.
  7. Understand the principles and demonstrate knowledge of the instruments and dental materials required to perform simple prosthodontic procedures related to implant dentistry.
    1. Fabricate radiographic templates for implant diagnosis and treatment planning
    2. Fabricate surgical templates for proper positioning of dental implants during surgery
    3. Perform impressions using specific implant components to fabricate provisional implant crowns
    4. Perform direct conversion of mandibular complete dentures to implant-assisted overdentures
    5. Make a custom acrylic impression tray for use with elastic impression materials.
    6. Select appropriate abutments for various implant restorations.
  8. Be ready to provide implant treatment in the clinic, under supervision.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#20. Manage simple implant procedures.

Course Name:Interdisciplinary Seminar
Course Number:
1181
Credits:
0
Course Director: Dr. Stephen Hsu
Predoctoral Year: 3
Semester: Winter (Jan.-April)
Time & Location: Friday 9am-12pm/DHS 773
Text(s): N/A

Grading & Evaluation: Attendance

What changes have been made to your course since last year?

  1. Course materials posted in TUSK for the participating faculty and students to review prior to the seminar.
  2. Six faculty from different specialities served in the panel for multi-discipline discussion and interacted with the students at the same time.
  3. Students were asked to come up with their respective diagnosis and treatment plans after the group discussion.

Course Goal

A patient case will be presented to the students by the course director. The students will be divided into several groups to develop diagnosis, treatment plans and prognosis. During each group’s presentation, faculty from Endodontics, Oral Pathology, Oral Surgery, Orthodontics, Periodontology and Prosthodontics will be present to provide interactive discussions.

Course Objectives

  1. To provide an environment for students to integrate knowledge from many subject specialties for most appropriate diagnosis and treatment planning.
  2. To diagnose and treatment plan medically compromised patients with multiple dental needs.
  3. To teach students “case-based presentations” for national and state examinations.
  4. To present different patient cases – change scenarios (labs, x-rays) and have the student learn to think “on their feet”. Students will learn how treatment would change with a different medical or social history.
  5. To teach drug interactions and appropriate use of pharmacologic agents related to patients’ treatment.
  6. To teach the student how to integrate the medical, social, economic and behavioral (Patient desires) discipline into a treatment plan.
  7. To emphasize critical thinking and patient management to the student.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

Course Name: Operative Dentistry
Course Number: 998
Credits:1 (Theory) 1(Practice) 1 (Pj)
Course Director: Dr. Carolyn Cottrell
Predoctoral Year: 1
Semester:Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Tuesday 1-4:30pm, 4:30-7:30pm; Thursday 9-12pm, 1-4:30pm, 4:30-7:30pm/DHS 8 & DHS 9

Text(s): Schwartz, Richard S., Summitt, James B., and Robbins, J. William. Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry, A Contemporary Approach, 3rd Ed., Quintessence Publishing, Inc. 2006.

Grading & Evaluation

91 and above = Honors

70 and above = Passing

69 and below = Failing

Theory grade: The theory grade is a numerical average of the grades you receive on 3 written examinations. Written examinations are cumulative with emphasis on recently covered material. Technical grade: The technical grade is a numerical grade based on technical performance on the practical examinations. Practical examinations are evaluated as ideal, acceptable or unacceptable.

Remediation: If the Student Promotion Committee recommends remediation of any portion of the course, remedial sessions will be set up to meet the requirements for reexamination as required. Remediation and reexamination will be held during the summer.

Course Goals & Objectives

  • Ability to communicate in the area of operative dentistry which requires a vocabulary that is based on the mastery of the nomenclature and terminology involved in describing the performance of these restorative procedures.
  • Introduce students to the instruments, terminology and basic principles of operative dentistry.
  • Present basic and complex silver amalgam preparations and restorations. Composite resin and restoration will also be introduced.
  • Provide the essential skills needed to perform true basic restorative procedures which are essential to successful entry into the performance of clinical operative dentistry.
  • Provide a background knowledge of biomaterials science and technology relevant to dentistry. It will consist of a series of lectures on dental biomaterials: their structure, physico-chemical and mechanical properties, applications in dentistry, advantages and disadvantages and material evaluation and selection.
  1. Course Objectives:
  2. At the end of the course, the students are expected to have a background of biomaterials science relevant to dentistry which will enable them to:
  3. Describe the principal properties of major biomaterials used in dentistry
  4. Have an overview of currently available dental biomaterials and their applications
  5. Have the ability to relate the properties of the materials to clinical technique and efficacy
  6. Have knowledge of the general composition of materials
  7. Have the ability to use the basic knowledge acquired from this course to critical thinking in the use of materials on patients clinical care.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by course

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#8. Identify and provide effective local anesthesia for oral treatment.

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Operative Workshop (Intro to Clinical Materials)
Course Number: 224
Credits: 0
Course Director: Dr. Melissa Ing
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Summer (May-Aug)
Time & Location: Tuesday 1-4pm

Course Goal/Objective

The goal of this workshop is to practice the use of the dental materials that the student will use in the clinic.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Operative Prep Workshop
Course Number: 5013
Credits: 0
Course Director: Dr. Peter Arsenault
Predoctoral Year:3
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: 4:30-7 pm; DHS-8

Course Goal/Objectives

The goal/objective of the workshop is to practice composite and amalgam restorations.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

Course Name: Pindex Workshop
Course Number:
5057
Credits:
Course Director:
Dr. Albert Intonti
Predoctoral Year:
3
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Tuesday 5-6pm/6-7pm/DHS 248

Course Goal/Objective

The goal/objective of this workshop is to review the pindexing technique.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#20. Manage simple implant procedures.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Porcelain Esthetic Dentistry Workshop
Course Number:
1164
Credits:
Course Director:
Dr. Ali Muftu
Predoctoral Year:
3
Semester: Fall/Winter (Nov.-Jan.)
Time & Location: Thursday 9am-12pm/DHS 4, Rm 1001
Grading & Evaluation: Attendance: Mandatory for 3rd year students.

  • Quiz with basic questions from the lecture.
  • Each crown will be evaluated at the end of the session in order to determine if the student successfully accomplished the exercise.

Course Goal

The primary goal of the Porcelain Esthetic Dentistry Workshop is to expose predoctoral students to the basic concepts of Optical Properties of Color and Dynamics of Light in Natural Dentition, followed by a workshop describing the Applications of Low Fusing Porcelain and External Staining.

Course Objectives

  • To introduce to the predoctoral students the nature of light and color and the interaction between light and matter
  • To understand and handle concepts of the Optical Properties of Color (Hue, Chrome, Value, Opalescence, Fluorescence, Transparence , Translucence, Iridescence.
  • To Introduce the importance of visualize and recognize surface texture and superficial gloss on shade selection.
  • To understand the Applications of Low Fusing Porcelain Systems. (Exposure to a correction of a proximal contact)
  • Expose the predoctoral student to shade alteration using external staining

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Postgraduate Prosthodontics Rotation
Course Number:
203
Credits:
0
Course Director:
Dr. Roya Zandparsa
Predoctoral Year:
3
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Th 4:30-7pm, DHS 2

Grading & Evaluation: Attendance

Course Goal

The primary goal of the course is to expose predoctoral students to an advanced level of prosthodontics.

Course Objectives

  1. To introduce complexity of prosthodotic treatments
  2. To familiarize students with comprehensive treatment planning procedures
  3. To help them to be able to identify advanced cases that should be treated by prosthodontists
  4. To encourage students to seek further prosthodontic training

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#12. Perform risk assessment, determine etiology of dental disease, communicate and demonstrate to patient approaches to modify behaviors contributing to dental disease.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Prosthodontics & Operative Dentistry
Course Number:
912
Credits:
2
Course Director:
Dr. Ekaterini Antonellou
Predoctoral Year:
3
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: F 8-845am; Merritt Auditorium

Grading & Evaluation

There will be three written examinations at the end of each section. Grading is based on students’ performance in each examination. The questions in the examination include every lecture presentation, laboratory workshop and the implant seminar with hands-on.

  • Examination I = 1/3 of the total score in this course
  • Examination II = 1/3 of the total score in this course
  • Examination III = 1/3 of the total score in this course

Remediation: Tutors are available from Student Affairs. A remediation course is available for those students who fail.

Course Goals/Objectives

Upon completion of the Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry Course, the student will

  1. Demonstrate the ability to integrate and apply concepts in this class to the patients’ care.
  2. Gain “first-hand” knowledge from some of the leading authorities in the Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry.
  3. Become familiar with the reading of the oral health sciences literature and how to interpret it.
  4. Promote lifelong learning from reading current literature.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#20. Manage simple implant procedures.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Prosthodontics/Esthetics Seminar
Course Number: 1187
Credits: 0
Course Director:
Dr. Darryl J. Lung
Predoctoral Year: 4
Semester: Fall Semester, Sept- Nov
Time & Location: Wednesday: 9-12pm, DHS-773
Text(s): None
Grading & Evaluation: Attendance

Seminar Description: The goal of this is to develop in each student a comprehensive understanding of dentistry and specifically Prosthodontics. The student will be introduced to the concept of ‘why’ they may perform a certain aspect of dentistry and not ‘what’ or ‘how’ (procedure and technique). Students will review all aspects of Diagnosis and Treatment Planning, Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics, Restorative Dentistry, and different aspects of Esthetics in dentistry. Topics covered include: Cast Post and Cores; Paraposts and Buildups; Tooth Preparations and Design; Diagnosis and Treatment Planning; Laboratory Techniques and Designs; Esthetics.

Seminar Objectives: Each student will understand ‘why’ the application of techniques and the diagnosis of procedures is vital in performing sound, fundamental Prosthodontic Dentistry.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#19. Treat caries, manipulate selected material and make appropriate restorations for patient comfort, function and esthetics.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.

Course Name: Removable Prosthodontics
Course Number:
910
Credits:
4
Course Director: Dr. David Hern & Dr. Luis Del Castillo
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr),Summer (May-Aug)
Time & Location: M 1-4pm/Tu 9am-12pm/W 1-4pm/Th 1-4:30pm
Text(s): Stewart’s Clinical Removable Partial Prosthodontics, 3rd edition, 2003 Rodney Phoenix, et al., Quintessence Publishing Co., Inc.

Grading & Evaluation: The minimal requirement for passing this course is a final overall grade of 70%.

Remediation: Lectures and reading assignments will be given as is necessary. Repetition of a laboratory assignment will continue until it meets the satisfaction of the course director.

Course Goals and Objectives

The goal of the course is to familiarize the dental student with all of the clinical steps and laboratory procedures which are required during the treatment of patients who will receive complete dentures, overdentures, immediate dentures and full maxillary opposing Mandibular removable partial dentures. This goal is accomplished through lectures like presentations, videos, demonstrations, and visual aids.

As the introductory course to the treatment of edentulous patients, students completing this course:

  1. Will have a basic understanding of edentulous oral anatomy, technology and terminology.
  2. Will have an understanding of the basic Complete Denture Technique as developed and taught at Tufts University School of Dental Medine
  3. Will be competent: To properly use and maintain applicable materials and equipment.
  4. Will have a basic understanding of accessory CDP techniques, such as relines, overdentures, immediate dentures, dentures with anatomic and semi-anatomic teeth, tissue conditioning, Triad techniques, dental laboratory communications and how to perform laboratory procedures professionally, cleanly, and safely.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#21. Perform procedures for fabrication of fixed and removable prostheses. Prepare prescriptions for the dental laboratory, and assess laboratory procedures completed by laboratory technicians.