Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Courses

Anesthesiology Course
Nitrous Oxide Sedation Workshop
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Rotation
Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Course

Course Name: Anesthesiology
Course Number:
870
Credits (Weight): 1
Course Director: Dr. Morton Rosenberg
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Tuesday: 1-2pm, DHS – Merritt Auditorium

Text(s)

Reference Texts:
Handbook of Local Anesthesia, S. F. Malamed; Mosby.
Local Anesthesia of the Oral Cavity, J.T.Jastak, J.A. Yagiela, D.Donaldson; Saunders
Mandibular Anesthesia, M. Rosenberg, J. Yagiela; Donation of Dentsply (REQUIRED)

Videos:
Techniques for Mandibular Anesthesia, D. Haas, Donation of Dentsply (REQUIRED)
Maxillary Anesthesia, M. Rosenberg, J.Yagiela; Donation of Dentsply

Other:
Local Anesthesia OnLine CE: http://www.internetdentalforum.org/ce/local/needs.htm

Grading & Evaluation

Final Examination 60%
Midterm 30%
Clinical 10%

Course Goal

The goals of this course are for the predoctoral student to become familiar with the spectrum of pain and anxiety control in dentistry, to safely and effectively administer routine intra-oral mandibular and maxillary local anesthetic injections, understand the pharmacological basis of local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors, and be able to recognize and manage emergencies which may arise as a consequence of treatment. Injection techniques for the production of local anesthesia for dental procedures are covered didactically, through videotape and CD-ROM demonstrations, and a clinical laboratory in which students perform selected nerve block injections on each other.

Course Objectives

The objectives of this course in the second year are to provide the predoctoral student with a review and the clinical application of:

  • overview of spectrum of pain and anxiety control in dentistry
  • head and neck anatomy
  • pharamacology of local anesthestics and vasoconstrictors
  • physiology of nerve conduction
  • local anesthetic armamentarium
  • specificinjection techniques
  • complications
    • local
    • systemic
  • Other forms of intra-oral anesthesia
  • Introduction to post-operative analgesics

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#7. Identify and provide effective local anesthesia for oral treatment.

#8. Identify and prescribe appropriate pharmacological agents, including noting any potential drug interactions related to dental treatment for pain, anxiety, prevention, infection, inflammation, surgical complications and conditions related to dental treatment.

Course Name: Nitrous Oxide Sedation Workshop
Course Number:
1247
Credits:0
Course Director:
Dr. Christopher Maller, Dr. Morton Rosenberg
Predoctoral Year: 4
Semester:Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Friday 9am-12pm, DHS 5- Conference Room
Text(s):None
Grading & Evaluation:Attendance

Course Goal:

The goal of the seminar is to expose the student to the clinical use of nitrous oxide-oxygen sedation.

Course Objectives:

The student will be able to:

  1. Understand the principles of nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation in dentistry.
  2. Prepare a perioperative sedation record.
  3. Determine the effects of nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation on a volunteer.

Course/Lecture Schedule:

The class is broken up into groups of approximately fifteen students, and each attends one three-hour hands-on session.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#10. Understand general anesthesia, nitrous oxide, conscious sedations and the use of non-pharmacological techniques to manage anxiety.

Course Name: Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Rotation
Course Number:
1150, 1176, 1188
Credits: 0
Course Director:
Dr. Constantinos Laskarides
Predoctoral Year: 3,4
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec), Winter (Jan-Apr), Summer (May-Aug)
Time & Location: Year 3: MWF 1-4, TuTh 9-12 (Fall/Winter); Year 3: M-F 9-12pm/1-4pm (Summer); Year 4: MWF 9-12, TuTh 1-4 (Fall/Winter), DHS- 5

Rotation Description

The Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine is committed to providing safe and effective care for patients and is dedicated to the education of predoctoral students and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents. Our mission is to provide the students with a broad academic background in the biomedical sciences and surgical principles, in the diagnosis and management of basic oral and maxillofacial surgery, including the management of medically compromise patients, and the fundamental knowledge, principles and surgical skills in the treatment of minor Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical problems. Our education goals are to train students whose clinical expertise is reinforced through a foundation in the basic sciences, good communications skills with patients, colleagues, and other health professionals, and above all, compassion, empathy, warmth and honesty for the welfare of our patients.

Rotation Goals

To develop within the students a foundation of professional knowledge coupled with the surgical skills to enable them to recognize and select those cases for operation which lie within the limit of their ability, and to refer other surgical problems wisely. Develop a sense of confidence in the students’ surgical skills and clinical judgment, and to encourage a desire for continued professional development and self-improvement through continuing education courses, postgraduate courses or graduate training.

To teach the students a standard pattern of intelligent history taking, examination, critical analysis of case findings, and full utilization of appropriate diagnostic aids all directed toward a sound diagnosis for an oral surgical problem. To develop within the student a foundation of professional knowledge coupled with minimum surgical skills to enable him/her to competently diagnose and operate upon oral surgery problems related to the practice of general dentistry.
To enable the student to recognize and to select those cases for operation which lie within the limits of his/her ability, and to refer other surgical problems wisely. The dentist assumes an ethical and legal responsibility too when he/she accepts a patient for oral surgery. When faced with a problem for which he/she is not qualified to treat, it is his/her professional responsibility to appropriately refer the patient for treatment. To develop a sense of confidence in the student’s surgical skills and clinical judgment, and to encourage a desire for continuation of professional study and self-improvement through continuing education courses, post-graduate courses or graduate training for a teaching career or specialty practice.

Rotation Schedule

The class is divided up into rotation groups of approximately 5-7 students. Most rotations are five half-days in one week In year 3, the rotation includes seminars.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#7. Manage oral (pulpal, periodontal or traumatic) or medical emergencies including performing CPR and activating local life support systems (EMS) and/or make appropriate referrals to medical and dental specialties.

#8. Identify and provide effective local anesthesia for oral treatment.

#9. Identify and prescribe appropriate pharmacological agents, including noting any potential drug interactions related to dental treatment for pain, anxiety, prevention, infection, inflammation, surgical complications and conditions related to dental treatment.

#10. Understand general anesthesia, nitrous oxide, conscious sedations and the use of non-pharmacological techniques to manage anxiety.

#15. Perform uncomplicated extractions of teeth and root tips and minor pre-prosthetic surgical procedures, including those requiring uncomplicated flap procedures.

#16. Manage and treat localized odontogenic infections and common operative and postoperative surgical complications.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

#20. Manage simple implant procedures.

#22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

Course Name: Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Course
Course Number: 903, 1141
Credits: 3
Course Director: Dr. Constantinos Laskarides
Predoctoral Year: 2, 3
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec), Winter (Jan-Apr), Summer (May-Aug)
Time &amp Location: Year 2, 3: 8-845am, Merritt Auditorium

Course Description

To teach the students a standard pattern of intelligent history taking, examination, critical analysis of case findings, and full utilization of appropriate diagnostic aids all directed toward a sound diagnosis for an oral surgical problem. Our mission is to provide the students with a broad academic background in the biomedical sciences and surgical principles, in the diagnosis and management of basic oral and maxillofacial surgery, including the management of medically compromise patients, and the fundamental knowledge, principles and surgical skills in the treatment of minor Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical problems. We educate in a stable academic environment backed by research and scholarly spirit.

Objectives

  • Provide a competent diagnosis and logical treatment plan for the oral surgery problem within the operator’s professional ability.
  • Use basic surgical instruments.
  • Perform extraction of normally erupted teeth.
  • Remove fractured roots resulting from the extraction of normally erupted teeth.
  • Prepare the oral cavity for the reception of prostheses. This includes the surgical management of alveolar bone and soft tissues without mutilation for the requirements of prosthetic foundation.
  • Remove surgically uncomplicated periapical granulomas and cysts of dental etiology.
  • Incise and drain intraoral subperiosteal abscesses and other localized infectious processes of dental origin.
  • Control hemorrhage from bone and soft tissues.
  • Detect prodromal signs, prevent and treat reactions of syncope, shock or other untoward reactions to anesthesia or surgery, which may require resuscitative measures.
  • Provide general and specific postoperative care to all extraction problems.
  • Biopsy or refer for biopsy lesions of the mouth and jaws requiring this diagnostic aid.
  • Reduce and immobilize simple fractures of the alveolus
  • Understand operating room technique, hospital procedure, and patient care through hospital experience.
  • Exposure to the broad spectrum of oral & maxillofacial surgery as a dental specialty, in the management of complicated facial fractures, orthognathic surgery, vestibuloplasty, bone and soft tissue grafting, dental implant surgery, tumor surgery, and other maxillofacial surgical procedures.