General Dentistry Courses

Behavioral Science Seminar I&II
Board Review III
Emergency Rotation
Ethics and Professionalism in Dentistry Course/Ethics and Professionalism Lab
Ethics and Professionalism Seminar
Introduction to Clinical Experience I&II
Oral Diagnosis/Treatment Planning Course
Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Course
Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Rotation
Pharmacology Course
Practice Management I&II Course
Practice Management Seminar I-IV

Course Name: Behavioral Science Seminar
Course Number:1145
Credits: 0
Course Director: Dr. Arthur Weiner
Predoctoral Year: 3
Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Tuesday 1-4pm, D738

Text(s): Syllabus and CD Rom- “The Difficult Patient- Understanding and Managing Dental Anxiety. The CD Rom is self-study for Seminar I.

Grading & Evaluation: Competency Exam: Given to a patient during clinic hours and graded by students Practice Coordinator–Pass or Fail

Remediation

Make-up seminar.

Course Goal

To provide students with sufficient knowledge so that they may understand how the emotions of fear and anxiety influences a patient’s behavior regarding dental treatment and to permit the students to acquire proficiency in recognizing and managing patients whose present behavior patterns might interfere with the delivery of dental care

Course Objectives

The student will hopefully be able to:

  1. make a correct assessment of the patient’s psychological and emotional needs by understanding the factors that are responsible for creating Difficult Patients, thru gaining basic knowledge of the emotions of Fear, Anxiety and Phobia, by understanding the interplay of cultural factors and their influence on behavior and by the understanding and use of various behavioral modalities that help modify behavior
  2. devise a personalized behavior management program based on behavior assessment data.
  3. Utilize a variety of behavior assessments modalities that include verbal and nonverbal communication, observation and interaction, written questionnaires and proper listening and attitudinal skills designed to provide the development of a positive personalized and professional patient-doctor relationship.
  4. design a behavior management program to lessen and or ameliorate anxiety, conflict and aversive behavior in all phase of treatment.

Course/Lecture Schedule

The class is broken up into groups of approximately fifteen students, and each attends one three-hour session.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

Name: Board Review III
Course Number:
805
Credits (Weight): 0
Course Director: Dr. Robert Urbon
Predoctoral Year: 4
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Monday, 4:30 -7pm – Room 848
Grading & Evaluation: N/A

Course Goal:

The goal of this seminar is to prepare the fourth year students for upcoming licensing examinations.

Course Objectives:

Prepare the fourth year students for upcoming licensing examinations.

Course/Lecture Schedule:

This seminar is held for three hours on either the third fourth Monday in October.

Course Name: Emergency Rotation
Course Number: 1149
Credits: 0
Course Director: Dr. Frank Odlum
Predoctoral Year:3,4
Semester: Fall, Winter, Summer
Time & Location:MWF 1-4, TuTh 9-12 (Fall/Winter – Year 3), M-F 9-4 (Summer – year 3) and MWF 9-12, TuTh 1-4 (Fall/Winter – Year 4

Course Goals:

  • To discuss differential diagnoses, the appropriate diagnosis and treatment.
  • To treat common dental emergencies.

Course Objectives:
The student will be able to:

  1. Perform an emergency examination, including history, oral examination, and radiographic examination.
  2. Diagnose, treatment plan and treat the emergency.
  3. Treat the endodontic emergency.
  4. Refer the emergency patient to oral and maxillofacial surgery as needed.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#7. Manage oral (pulpal, periodontal or traumatic) or medical emergencies including performing CPR and activating local life support systems (EMS) and/or make appropriate referrals to medical and dental specialties.

#16. Manage and treat localized odontogenic infections and common operative and postoperative surgical complications.

Course Name: Ethics and Professionalism in Dentistry/ Ethics & Professionalism Lab
Course Number: 893, 5893
Credits: 2
Course Director: Dr. Eric Weinstock, Ms. Eileen Moyer, Ms. Elizabeth Richardson
Predoctoral Year:1
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location:Wednesday 3:15-5pm

Text(s):
Ozar, D.T., and Sokol, D.J.: Dental Ethics at Chairside: Professional Principles and Practical Applications. St. Louis, Mosby-Yearbook, Second Addition, 2002.

Grading & Evaluation:

The course consists of three sections:

Ethics and Professionalism – 90%
Library Course -10%

Library Course – Librarians will demonstrate online the Tufts catalog, MEDLINE and various Web resources concerned with ethics and professional standards in dentistry. A short paper with bibliography will be assigned.

Workshops will cover the mechanics of searching the Tufts catalog, MEDLINE and a Web search engine for assigned paper topics. As attendance is required, please contact Elizabeth Richardson in the Hirsh Health Sciences Library if you must reschedule your session.

The Ethics and Professionalism section will consist of:

Final Exam – 75%
Quizzes and Class Participation – 25%

Course Goals:

  • Develop dental practitioners who can think and act in an ethical manner, and who understand that being a dental professional means being committed to serving others.
  • To foster students understanding of the ethical and legal principles common in dentistry.
  • Provide students with models for critically evaluating incidents in light of specific ethical principles.
  • Provide students with a forum in which to analyze their own values in light of ethical and legal mandates.
  • Provide students with information regarding the legal requirements of informed consent, reporting of child abuse and confidentiality.
  • Develop student’s skills for searching the dental literature (i.e., library catalogs, MEDLINE and the web).
  • Develop students’ ability to review and summarize the literature and communicate their conclusions in writing with professional format.

Course Objectives:

  • Describe common modes of ethical reasoning.
  • Describe legal and ethical codes and their relationship to malpractice lawsuits.
  • Understand the legal requirements and ethical issues of informed consent and peer review.
  • Understand the ethical and legal perspectives of confidentiality in relation to HIV positive patients, child abuse and anorexia nervosa.
  • Provide students with information regarding the legal requirements of informed consent, reporting of child abuse and confidentiality.
  • Recognize the meaning of professionalism.
  • Analyze an ethical dilemma using Ozar’s four-step model of professional-ethical decision making.
  • Research a topic in dental ethics and identify relevant, current and authoritative information from the published literature and websites of professional organizations. Summarize research findings in a short paper with a properly formatted bibliography.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course are bolded:

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

Course Name: Ethics and Professionalism Seminar
Course Number:
1166
Credits:0
Course Director:
Dr. Eric Weinstock
Predoctoral Year:3
Semester: Winter
Time & Location: Wednesday 1-4pm

Text(s):
Ozar, D.T., and Sokol, D.J.: Dental Ethics at Chairside: Professional Principles and Practical Applications. St. Louis, Mosby-Yearbook, Second Addition, 2002.

Grading & Evaluation:
Attendance

Course Goals:

  • Develop dental practitioners who can think and act in an ethical manner, and who understand that being a dental professional means being committed to serving others.
  • To foster students understanding of the ethical and legal principles common in dentistry.
  • Provide students with models for critically evaluating incidents in light of specific ethical principles.
  • Provide students with a forum in which to analyze their own values in light of ethical and legal mandates.
  • Provide students with information regarding the legal requirements of informed consent, reporting of child abuse and confidentiality.
  • Develop student’s skills for searching the dental literature (i.e., library catalogs, MEDLINE and the web).
  • Develop students’ ability to review and summarize the literature and communicate their conclusions in writing with professional format.

Course Objectives:

  • Describe common modes of ethical reasoning.
  • Describe legal and ethical codes and their relationship to malpractice lawsuits.
  • Understand the legal requirements and ethical issues of informed consent and peer review.
  • Understand the ethical and legal perspectives of confidentiality in relation to HIV positive patients, child abuse and anorexia nervosa.
  • Provide students with information regarding the legal requirements of informed consent, reporting of child abuse and confidentiality.
  • Recognize the meaning of professionalism.
  • Analyze an ethical dilemma using Ozar’s four-step model of professional-ethical decision making.
  • Research a topic in dental ethics and identify relevant, current and authoritative information from the published literature and websites of professional organizations. Summarize research findings in a short paper with a properly formatted bibliography.

Course/Lecture Schedule:
The first seminar is the entire class. For the second seminar, the class is broken up into groups of approximately fifteen students, and each attends one three-hour session.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course are bolded:

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

Course Name: Introduction to Clinical Experience I & II
Course Number:2011, 899
Credits: 3
Course Director:Dr. Paul Vankevich
Predoctoral Year:1,2
Semester:Fall (Sept-Dec), Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: M 9am-12pm/Tu 4:30-7pm/F 9am-12pm

Text(s):
Treatment Planning in Dentistry, Stefanac SJ, Nesbit SP. Mosby 2007(available in the bookstore and on reserve in the library)

Grading & Evaluation:
Students are required to participate and pass each competency. Course grading will be based on attendance, successful attendance of all hands-on activities and competencies, and the results of two examinations. The final grade for the course will be determined by the point summation of: number of faculty documented clinical assists, number of completed rotations and competencies and the number of points from the midterm and final examinations. They are a maximum of 6, 30 and 64 points respectively.

Remediation:
Tutors are available through student affairs. Remediation course is available for those who fail the course.

Course Goal & Objectives:
The goal of the course is to introduce second year dental students to these aspects of clinical dentistry which are not taught in the didactic or preclinical courses. The knowledge of skills acquired in this series of lectures, clinical rotations and workshops will enable the student to successfully transition from the patient simulation program to the clinical care of actual patients.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#9. Identify and prescribe appropriate pharmacological agents, including noting any potential drug interactions related to dental treatment for pain, anxiety, prevention, infection, inflammation, surgical complications and conditions related to dental treatment.

#16. Manage and treat localized odontogenic infections and common operative and postoperative surgical complications.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

Course Name:Oral Diagnosis/Treatment Planning
Course Number:
901
Credits:1
Course Director: Dr. David Russell
Predoctoral Year:2
Semester: Summer (May-Aug)
Time & Location: Friday 8-8:45am

Text(s):
Treatment Planning in Dentistry, Stefanac SJ, Nesbit SP. Mosby 2007 (available in the bookstore and on reserve in the library)

Grading & Evaluation:
As consistent with the TUSDM policy, attendance at the course lectures in not mandatory. Because of the important multidisciplinary nature of this clinically relevant course and the because of the clinical case presentation format, students are strongly encouraged to attend all lectures. The Course Director and course faculty will make every attempt to have lecture material available on TUSK as soon as possible before the lecture. Please use the TUSK site to help you in your management of course material.

As mentioned above, this course will be graded in an honors-pass-fail format. The course is designed in two parts. The first part will be reflected in the lectures before the mid-term exam and consist predominantly of the fundamentals of oral diagnosis and treatment planning. The second part of the course will consist of six lectures and be predominantly case based.

Grading will be based chiefly on the results of two examinations (a multiple-choice midterm and a “blue-book” final examination). The final grade for the course will be determined by the point summation of the two examinations. At the discretion of the Course Director, a brief quiz may be given at the start of a lecture. In the event that that occurs, the quiz average will not count more than 10% of the final grade, making the mid-term and the final each worth 45% of the grade.

The mid-term examination and the final examination will include material covered during the lectures and in the assigned readings. The final examination will be cumulative.

Remediation:
Remediation will be done by the course director on an as needed basis.

What changes have been made to your course since last year?: 50% of the course is totally case-based and clinical practice coordinators present them.

Course Goals and Objectives:
After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Place the prevention and treatment of dental diseases and disorders in perspective, regarding the goal of achieving optimum craniofacial health of the patient. Relate the importance of oral health to the overall well-being and quality of life of the patient. Understand the interactive relationship between oral health and general systemic health.
  2. Understand the process of patient evaluation, the materials, methods and strategies used in oral diagnosis and the types of examinations performed. Know the modalities and means available in the orodental diagnostic process. Apply the scientific thought processes in oral diagnosis and apply problem-solving processes in treatment planning. Utilize the risk assessment and risk management process in the diagnosis and treatment planning of a dental patient.
  3. Understand the importance of timely and accurate oral diagnosis and patient assessment in the management of developmental and acquired dental diseases and disorders. Realize the importance of knowing what is clinically normal, what is abnormal, and knowing when treatment is indicated. Acknowledge the limitations of specific dental treatments and relate this information to patients.
  4. Know the methods and the importance of appropriate dental record documentation and communication, both from a practical and a dental-legal perspective. Clinically the TUSDM Axium digital dental record system.
  5. Clinically apply the various methods, materials and strategies available to optimize and effectively determine an accurate oral diagnosis.
  6. Outline the methods for the formulation of a logical and rational treatment plan that is consistent with the needs, desires and abilities of the patient. Understand the appropriate prioritization (triage) and sequencing of the components of a treatment plan. Realize that there may be many ways of managing a specific disease or condition, but that there can be only one correct diagnosis.
  7. Know the importance of provider-patient and provider-provider communication in the diagnosis and treatment planning process. Realize the necessity of proper informed consent prior to patient treatment.
  8. Benefit from the diagnosis and treatment planning experience and expertise of the many faculty dental specialists. This will facilitate the student’s ability to establish a quality, patient-specific, multidisciplinary comprehensive treatment plan. Course material will be presented on a level that is consistent with the student’s present knowledge and experience.
  9. Realize the treatment limitations of general dentistry providers and know how and when it is appropriate to refer patients for specialty care. Acknowledge the importance for a provider to recognize his/her dental practice limitations.
  10. Be aware that not every dental and oral condition mandates treatment intervention. Be able to assess the risk/benefit ratio of all prospective treatment and ascertain the age-specificity (pediatric versus geriatric) and appropriateness of treatment planning. Realize the importance of determining the cause of dental problems and the need to control the etiology of the disease process.
  11. Show the implications of specific systemic diseases on dental treatment and how dental treatment can positively affect the general health status of patients.
  12. Relate, integrate and apply the basic sciences (dental anatomy, embryology, histology and physiology), behavioral sciences and the clinical sciences (radiology, oral pathology, pharmacology, preventive dentistry) to the clinical process of patient diagnosis and treatment planning.
  13. Prepare the student to successfully challenge Part 2 of the National Dental Board Examination and any regional dental licensure examinations. Prepare the student to better formulate clinical case presentations in oral diagnosis and treatment planning.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#7. Manage oral (pulpal, periodontal or traumatic) or medical emergencies including performing CPR and activating local life support systems (EMS) and/or make appropriate referrals to medical and dental specialties.

Course Name: OMF Radiology Course
Course Number:
869
Credits (Weight): 2
Course Director: Dr. Aruna Ramesh
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Fall/Winter (Sept. – April);
Time & Location: T 2:15 – 3:15pm; Fri 1 – 2pm – Merritt Auditorium

Course Goals:

This course is designed to provide basic knowledge in oral and maxillofacial radiology to the second year dental students. The structure of this course introduces the student to radiation physics, biology and protection and various commonly utilized imaging modalities in dentistry with their clinical applications. It covers principles of radiographic interpretation by starting with recognition of normal anatomic presentation. This is followed by recognition of radiographic abnormalities, radiographic description of the same, categorization of the abnormality and finally arriving at the differential diagnosis. This course will enable the student to trouble shoot technical errors in radiographs, prescribe the necessary radiographs in patients, interpret radiographs in a systematic manner and make decisions on follow up.

Course Objectives:

On completion of the 2nd year didactic OMFR course, a student will be able to:

  1. Understand the basic principles of radiation production, list and identify factors necessary for the production and control of ionizing radiation in dentistry.
  2. Understand the basic principles of radiation biology
  3. Understand and List methods of radiation protection as it involves the operator, patient and public.
  4. Understand the concept of production of radiographic images
  5. Understand the radiographic characteristics of density, contrast, resolution, geometric unsharpness, magnification and distortion
  6. Understand the Principles of Shadow Casting , paralleling and bisecting-angle intraoral techniques
  7. Understand and diagnose errors in radiographic technique and discuss corrective measures
  8. Understand basic principles of digital radiography and discuss advantages and disadvantages of digital radiography
  9. Understand principles of tomography and panoramic radiography
  10. Understand errors in panoramic radiography and discussion of corrective measures
  11. Discuss various extraoral and TMJ imaging modalities in dentistry
  12. Discuss various advanced imaging modalities available in dentistry
  13. Understand legal implications and quality assurance for use of radiography in dentistry
  14. Understand patient selection criteria for prescription of dental radiographs
  15. Interpret intra-oral and panoramic radiographs and be able to recognize and identify normal anatomic structures of teeth, jaws, restorative materials and associated structures
  16. Recognize and identify common dental pathology such as caries, periapical and periodontal pathologies
  17. Understand and use descriptive terminology for radiographic appearance of pathology, generate a lesional category (developmental, benign, malignant, systemic/metabiloic, trauma and inflammation) and differential diagnoses.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

Course Name: OMF Radiology Rotation
Course Number:
1340, 1351
Credits (Weight): 0
Course Director: Dr. Rumpa Ganguly
Predoctoral Year: 2 and 3
Semester: Year 3, fall/winter (Sept. – April); Year 2, summer trimester (May – Aug)
Time & Location: M, W, F 1 -4pm, Tu, Thu 9 – 12pm, DHS-3

Rotation Goal

The goal of the course is to prepare the student in taking diagnostic radiographic surveys using proper position indicating devices and infection control protocol. The year 3 dental students are required to attend 5 half sessions of three hours duration during the week of their OMFR rotation. Each of these sessions begins with a short seminar/group discussion on various topics within OMFR. The seminar on Monday PM includes a review of the digital imaging and viewing software, MiPACS , review of radiographic positioning devices and radiographic technique. The seminar on Tuesday includes individual (1:1) radiographic technique review session; the students can individually review a set of radiographs taken by them, with the faculty, discussing the appropriateness of their technique and possible ways to overcome technique errors on the images. The Wednesday seminar is a case-based interactive group discussion session where students work on their skills of generating differential diagnosis based on radiographic presentation of variety of pathological conditions. The seminar on Thursday is a case-based discussion on application of 3D imaging (CBCT) in diagnosis and treatment planning of certain challenging clinical situations where 2D images do not provide sufficient information. The seminar on Friday includes a competency exam. The Year 2 students attend two sessions throughout the summer.

Rotation Objectives

The students on rotation learn to take intra-oral and panoramic radiographs on patients during their assigned time in the rotation. The competency examination is interpretation based and held every rotation week. The students are graded on their interpretation as well as their radiographic technique skills for the OMFR rotation. The student will be able to:

  1. Ability to select the radiographic series appropriate for each patient.
  2. Proficiency in patient management and radiation protection techniques
  3. Technical proficiency in performing periapical, bitewing and panoramic dental radiographic projections
  4. Ability to correctly mount radiographs
  5. Ability to evaluate radiographs for diagnostic quality
  6. Proficiency in correcting radiographic technique

Remediation

When a student is found to be below average in radiographic technique, He/She is advised to practice taking radiographs on the manikin under the supervision of radiology faculty/staff. Only when satisfactory improvement is seen, is the student allowed to resume taking radiographs on patients.
TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#5. Develop a comprehensive, properly sequenced treatment plan and alternative plans based on all diagnostic data. The plans should include addressing chief complaint, emergency care and referral for systemic disease, prevention, periodontal care, endodontic care, restorative/prosthodontic care, maintenance and recall.

Course Name: Pharmacology
Course Number: 1139
Credits: 2
Course Director: Dr. Michael Thompson
Predoctoral Year:3
Semester:Fall (Sept-Dec), Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: TuTh 8-8:45am/Merritt Auditorium

Grading & Evaluation:
Four scheduled multiple choice exams with optional fifth exam

Remediation:
Students that fail must participate in a remedial course offered during the summer months

Course Goal:
The goal of the course is to increase the student’s comfort level with pharmacological information, to provide them with a background of knowledge to enable them to make appropriate decisions involving the use of dental medications in patient care, and instill in them the curiosity that will encourage them to stay current in this everchanging field.

Course Objectives:

  1. This course is not meant to be an exhaustive compendium of pharmacology. Rather, the course focuses primarily on those drugs used by the Dentist – local anesthetics, antibiotics, and analgesics. These are reviewed in terms of how they work, their clinical advantages and disadvantages compared to each other in terms of appropriate usage, adverse side effects, and potential drug:drug interactions.
  2. We will also review those medications most frequently taken by patients, e.g., cardiovascular drugs, discussing them from the perspective of how they work, and how they might impact dental management of the patient in terms of special precautions that need to be taken, potential drug;drug interactions that might require alteration of standard treatment regimens, oral side effects, etc.
  3. Finally, the course will stress the ever changing nature of the pharmacology knowledge base and the need for the student to keep informed and updated in terms of not only new drugs becoming available, but new knowledge regarding older, traditional drugs that may require alterations in how these drugs are used. By the end of the course the student should have a strong working vocabulary of pharmacology upon which to build and keep up to date.

Upon completion of this course students should:

a) understand the actions of and appropriate therapeutic use of local anesthetics, sedatives, and analgesic medications. This knowledge is crucial in the provision of effective, safe, and pain free care to the calm or anxious patient both during and after dental treatment

b) understand the rational use of antiinfective agents in dentistry, both in terms of the management of existing orofacial infections and for prophylaxis against the development of bacterial endocarditis or other infection post treatment

c) understand the importance of organ function/disease status in altering the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and therapeutic action of dentally used drugs such as antibiotics and local anesthetics. Using this knowledge, the student should be able to appropriately modify usage and dosing of standard drugs or substitute alternative medications.

d) have a basic knowledge of commonly prescribed drugs. Many of the patients that seek treatment in a dental school environment are significantly medically compromised. Management of such patient often necessitates frequent consultation with their physicians as to their medical status at the time of treatment, need for prophylactic antibiotic treatment, dosage adjustment, appropriate use of local anesthetic vasoconstrictor containing preparations, etc. Furthermore, when reviewing a patient’s medical history and the drugs that a patient might be taking, the student should be able to identify any problematic combinations of medications and advise the patient to check with their physician regarding their need to be taking such medications.

e) be informed as to potentially problematic interactions that may arise between medications the patient may be taking for acute or chronic medical conditions and therapeutic agents such as local anesthetics or antibiotics that the dentist needs to utilize for appropriate management of the patient. Upon recognizing such interactions, the student should be able to substitute alternative medications

f) have a sufficient base of pharmacological information upon which to continue to build in the future via self-education, as well as knowing how to access new information when the need arises

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#8. Identify and provide effective local anesthesia for oral treatment.

#9. Identify and prescribe appropriate pharmacological agents, including noting any potential drug interactions related to dental treatment for pain, anxiety, prevention, infection, inflammation, surgical complications and conditions related to dental treatment.

#10. Understand general anesthesia, nitrous oxide, conscious sedations and the use of non-pharmacological techniques to manage anxiety.

Course Name: Practice Management I & II
Course Number: 892, 908
Credits:.5
Course Director: Dr. Samuel Shames
Predoctoral Year:1, 2
Semester:Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Friday 12-1pm/ 3:30-4:30 Merritt Auditorium

Grading & Evaluation:
Grading will be pass, fail, honors based on a final examination

Course Goal:
The goal of the course is to introduce the student to the privileges and responsibilities of being a Doctor in our society. To gain insight in the importance and nature of the Doctor-Patient relationship. To show the student the factors that are needed for success in practice beyond clinical skills. To begin to understand the value of competent concise record keeping and how it is related to risk management. The course will begin to introduce the new professional to the unique factors in planning and designing a modern dental office. Understanding personal finances and the function of an accountant in the business of a dental practice.

Course Objectives:

The student will be able to:

  1. Understand the meaning of being a Doctor and the obligations we have to our patients.
  2. Understand credit, debt, and financing and what a CPA does for a dental practice.
  3. Realize some of the decisions and thoughts that go into dental office design.
  4. Observe why record keeping is important to the patients care as well as providing protection for the Doctor.
  5. Help student realize the factors that determine success beyond clinical excellence.

Course/Lecture Schedule:

5 one hour lectures

  1. Dentistry and Relationships
  2. Learning the Practice and Business of Dentistry
  3. Dental Office Design
  4. The Role of Accounting in Dental Practice
  5. Success in the Private Practice of Dentistry

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#6. Communicate the treatment plan to the patient, including diagnostic alternatives, patient concerns, risks, prognosis, time requirements, fees and payment plan options and obtain a writing informed consent.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

#25. Understand the appropriate sources of information for career options, management and marketing of a dental practice.

#26. Understand the requirements for infections control and risk management.

Course Name:Practice Management Seminar I
Course Number: 892
Credits:0
Course Director: Dr. Sam Shames
Predoctoral Year:3
Semester:Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Wednesday 11am-12pm, Merritt

Course Goal:
To review the many career options open to the new graduate and to expose 3rd year students to the details of the cash flow of a dental practice and how that relates to the valuation of a practice that is for sale

Course Objectives:
The student should:

  1. be able to view a dental practice as a business
  2. analyze some of the reasons some practices do better than other practices financially
  3. begin to understand the factors that determine the value of a dental practice and the transferability of these factors
  4. gain more information about the different choices available for their careers after dental school

Course/Lecture Schedule:
Three hour seminar

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

#25. Understand the appropriate sources of information for career options, management and marketing of a dental practice.

Course Name:Practice Management Seminar II
Course Number: 908
Credits:0
Course Director: Dr. Sam Shames
Predoctoral Year: 3
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Friday 1-4pm, DHS-8

Course Goal:
To expose and inform 3rd year students to the newest technologies being developed to advance and enhance the practice of dentistry.

Course Objectives:

  1. understand how the practice of dentistry may change because of advances in technology
  2. come out of the seminar with resources to investigate and evaluate these technologies
  3. gain insight into procedures and techniques being developed will benefit their patients and make their practice more interesting and exciting for them

Course/Lecture Schedule:
Three hour seminar

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#2. Understand psychosocial principles, behavior management and how to apply these skills for better patient care.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#23. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

Course Name:Practice Management Seminar III
Course Number: 1186
Credits:0
Course Director: Dr. Samuel Shames
Predoctoral Year:4
Semester:Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location:Wednesday 9am-12pm, D738

Course Goal:
The goal of this seminar is to review the different options available to new graduates in the profession of dentistry

Course Objectives:
The student will receive a review of the options available in the profession of dentistry and will get into interactive detail

Course/Lecture Schedule:
Overview of Career Options
Three hour workshops with individualized attention in groups of fifteen 4th year students

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#24. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

Course Name:Practice Management Seminar IV
Course Number:
1195
Credits:0
Course Director: Dr. Samuel Shames
Predoctoral Year: 4
Semester:Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Wednesday 9am-12pm, D738

Course Goal:
The goal of the course is to prepare the student for what is required to actually get started in the practice of dentistry

Course Objectives:
The student will be able to:

Understand the process and requirements of licensure, have resources to begin to look for an associateship or practice to purchase. Contracts for employee associate and independent contractor dentist will be discussed.

Know where to find resources to advise and assist in the independent practice of dentistry.

Course/Lecture Schedule:
Life After Dental School
3 hour workshop giving individualized attention in groups of fifteen to 4th year students.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1 Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#22. Understand resources available and the role of dental organizations in promoting the oral health of the public.

#23. Communicate with and provide care for a diverse population of patients (including special care) in order to develop a commitment to community service.

#24. Understand the appropriate sources of information for career options, management and marketing of a dental practice.

#25. Understand the requirements for infections control and risk management.