Basic Science Courses

Gross Anatomy
Histology
Neuroanatomy
Biochemistry
Infectious Diseases
Infectious Diseases Lab
Immunology
Physiology
Risk Management/Safety/Infection Control Symposium

Course Name: Gross Anatomy
Course Number:137
Credits: 4
Course Director: Dr. Paul Kwan
Predoctoral Year:1
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Monday/Wednesday 9am-1pm, Friday 9am-12pm – Merritt

Text(s):Moore and Dalley Clinical Oriented Anatomy, 5th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2005.

Moore, Keith L. Before We are Born, 6th ed. W. Saunders Co. 2003

Grading & Evaluation:
There are four examinations weighted as follows:

Exam I: 15%

Exam II: 25%

Exam III: 25%

Exam IV: 20%

The remaining 15% of the grade is determined by oral evaluation in lab.

All examinations include structure identification, Osteology, radiographic images and theoretical questions concerning gross anatomy and embryology. The first three examinations are short answer.

Remediation:
Tutors are available through Student Affairs.

A remediation course is available for those who fail the course.

Course Goal:
The goal of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of the gross (dissectible) structures of the human body, particularly of the head and neck regions and to relate this knowledge to the practice of dentistry.

Course Objectives:
The student will be able to understand:

1. The structure and function of the peripheral nervous system, both somatic and autonomic, with emphasis on the cranial nerves.
2. The developmental basis of adult structure: gametogenesis, fertilization and germ layer formation; embryology of the face, palate, pharynx and tongue; development of cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems.
3. The structure and function of pectoral, axillary and shoulder regions; an overview of the upper limb.
4. The anatomy of the neck; triangles and their contents, visceral compartment, fascial planes, root of the neck and its continuity with the mediastinum.
5. The osteology of the skull, with reference to muscular attachments, cranial nerves and blood supply of head and neck.
6. The face and parotid region, with emphasis on the muscles of facial expression.
7. The temporal/infratemporal regions, with emphasis on muscles of mastication and temporomandibular joint structure and function.
8. The cranial cavity: meninges, venous sinuses (particularly the cavernous sinus) and intracranial course of cranial nerves.
9. The anatomy of the special senses of the head; the orbit (vision), nasal cavities (smell), and ear (hearing and equilibrium).
10. The soft structures of the oral cavity, tongue, palate, pharynx, larynx, submandibular and pterygopalatine regions as observed in the bisected head.
11. The lymphatic drainage of head and neck, with emphasis on spread of metastases.
12. Cross-sect anatomy of the head, with emphasis on magnetic resonance and computer tomographic techniques.
13. The anatomy of thorax, abdominal and pelvic areas.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course:

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#8. Identify and provide effective local anesthesia for oral treatment.

#15. Perform uncomplicated extractions of teeth and root tips and minor pre-prosthetic surgical procedures, including those requiring uncomplicated flap procedures.

#16. Manage and treat localized odontogenic infections and common operative and postoperative surgical complications.

#20. Manage simple implant procedures.

#22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

Course Name: Histology
Course Number: 30
Credits: 4
Course Director: Dr. Alvar W Gustafson
Predoctoral Year:1
Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location:Monday & Wednesday 1-5pm; Friday 9-12pm/ Merritt Auditorium
Text(s): Required: Ross et al. (2006) Histology. A Text and Atlas. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia

Avery (2002) Oral Development and Histology. Thieme, New York ORBerkovitz et al. (2002) Oral Anatomy, Histology & Embryology, Mosby, Edinburgh

Stedman’s Medical Dictionary. LWW, Philadelphia OR Dorland’s Medical Dictionary. Saunders, Philadelphia

Grading & Evaluation: 206 total points over 4 examinations and 6 quizzes.

Course Goals & Objectives:

  1. To prepare the student for the study of pathology.
  2. To understand the structure and function of our bodies organs systems and understand the management of their clinical problems.
  3. To provide an understanding on which to construct the principles of other basic sciences, such as biochemistry, physiology, immunology.
  4. To provide basic skills in problem solving and critical thinking.
  5. To develop mental algorithms and tree structures- important skills for all diagnoses.
  6. Develop visual skills.
  7. To understand microscopic architecture and the organization of cells, tissues and organs, in relation to function in the study of medicine and dentistry.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course:

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence).

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#18. Inform the patient regarding the nature and extent to the disease or disorder and provide the appropriate management and/or referral.

Course Name: Neuroanatomy
Course Number: 397
Credits: 3
Course Director: Dr. Karina Meiri
Predoctoral Year: 1
Semester: Summer (May-Aug)
Time & Location: Monday 1-5pm; Tuesday 9-10:30am; Wednesday & Friday 9-12pm, 1-5pm/Merritt Auditorium

Text(s):

  • Manter & Gatz’s Clinical Anatomy & Physiology 10th Edition (Recommended, not required)
  • Detailed Syllabus and Lecture Notes: prepared by Course Instructors;
  • Drs. Meiri, Jacobson and Schwob.

Grading & Evaluation:

There are two examinations, weighted as follows:

  • Midterm 50%
  • Final 50%.

The examinations are not cumulative.

Remediation:

The instructors are available throughout the course. Tutors are available from Student affairs. A remediation course is available for those who fail the course.

Course Goal:

The goal of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of the structure and function of the central nervous system of the human, particularly as it pertains to the head and neck region, and to relate this knowledge to the practice of dentistry.

Course Objectives:

The student will be able to understand:

  1. The structure, classification, organization and function of the components of the central nervous system.
  2. The developmental basis of the central and peripheral nervous system as it pertains to organization of the mature structures.
  3. The structure and function of the external and internal spinal cord, particularly the major ascending and descending tracts.
  4. The structure and function of the cranial nerves and their direct and indirect associations with the brainstem essential for performing a neurological examination.
  5. The structural and functional consequences of the interactions of the spinal cord, brainstem and midbrain with the thalamus.
  6. The major functional attributes of the hypothalamus
  7. The structure and function of the basal ganglia and cerebellum and disorders of movement control especially focused on the head and neck region.
  8. The structure and regulation of the special senses, especially with respect to the function of the cranial nerves.
  9. The structure and function of the cortex especially with respect to control of movement, vision and language.
  10. The blood supply to the central nervous system and the head and neck.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

  • 3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.
  • 4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.
  • 8. Identify and provide effective local anesthesia for oral treatment.
  • 15. Perform uncomplicated extractions of teeth and root tips and minor pre-prosthetic surgical procedures, including those requiring uncomplicated flap procedures.
  • 16. Manage and treat localized odontogenic infections and common operative and postoperative surgical complications.
  • 20. Manage simple implant procedures.
  • 22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

Course Name: Biochemistry
Course Number: 887
Credits: 2
Course Director: Dr. Larry Feig
Predoctoral Year: 1
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Monday 9-10am/2-3pm; Tuesday 11-12pm; Wednesday 2-3pm; Friday 1-3pm/ Merritt Auditorium

Text(s):
“Biochemistry” by L. Stryer (5th edition, 2002)

Grading & Evaluation:
4 exams throughout the semester

Remediation:
Students who fail on the basis of these 4 exams are given a chance to retake similar exams at the end of the semester on sections of the course in which they did poorly.

Course Goals & Objectives:
The course is designed to provide an understanding of the biochemical basis of physiological processes. While the emphasis is on functional and regulatory aspects, a solid knowledge of the structure of major biological substances and of enzymatic reactions is required to have a clear understanding of how biochemical reactions determine physiological function and regulation. The course is concerned primarily with the biochemical basis of normal processes, but examples of disease states are used to show how specific biochemical defects can lead to illness.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

Course Name: Infectious Diseases
Course Number: 871
Credits: 2
Course Director:Dr. Katya Helwein
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Fall (Sept-Oct)
Time & Location: Tuesday and Thursday, various times, room 848 (Pre-Clinical Lab)

Course Goals

The primary goal of the Infectious Disease course is to teach students the basic mechanisms of pathogenesis. Learning and understanding this information allows the students to appreciate the importance of employing proper protective and prophylactic procedures to protect both the patient and themselves. Understanding basic mechanisms of pathogenesis gives students the ability to make important judgments about practices used to prevent infections by currently recognized pathogens and to make rational decisions about the potential for serious problems caused by new diseases that arise in the future.

The course in Infectious Disease emphasizes how a variety of pathogens gain entrance to the body through the oro-facial complex and how to recognize a group of diseases that are often initially present in the oral cavity. Examples of lectures covering this topic are those on pyogenic cocci, sexually transmitted diseases, central nervous system diseases, infections in and from the gut, viral diseases, and respiratory diseases including tuberculosis. For example, for microbial and viral pathogens that can be found in the oral cavity the students are taught a framework for analyzing host pathogen interactions and then given a specific example of an infectious disease. The framework consists of explaining the importance of understanding the following principles in infectious disease: Encounter, Entry, Spread, Multiplication, Damage, and Outcome.

Course Name:Infectious Diseases Laboratories
Course Number: 1243
Credits: 0
Course Director: Dr. Carol Kumamoto
Predoctoral Year: 2
Semester: Fall (Sept-Dec)
Time & Location: Tuesday 9am-12pm; Wednesday 10am-12pm, 9am-12pm, 9-10am

Grading & Evaluation: Completion of all required exercises. Laboratory report.

Remediation: Tutors are available from Student Affairs. A remediation course is given if a student fails.

What changes have been made to your course since last year?:

New course director. New teaching assistants

Course Goal:

The goal of the course is to teach students the nature of the microorganisms found in the oral cavity.

Course Objectives:

The student will be able to:

1. Culture bacteria from their dental plaque.
2. Identify bacteria using a series of bacteriological methods.
3. Assess the antibiotic resistance of Staphylococci.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#3, Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#16. Manage and treat localized odontogenic infections and common operative and postoperative surgical complications.

Course Name: Immunology
Course Number: 867
Credits: 2
Course Director: Peter Brodeur, PhD
Predoctoral Year: 1
Semester: Summer
Time & Location: M, Tu, Th 1-3pm

Text(s): Immunology: A Short Course by Coico, Sunshine and Benjamini Fifth Edition (2003) Wiley Liss

Grading & Evaluation:
Exams consist of multiple-choice type questions. Midterm counts 40% of grade. Final exam (cumulative) counts for 60% of the course grade.

Remediation:
All remediation plans are made with the approval of the Student Promotions Committee. Dr. Brodeur provides individual tutoring to prepare students for re-examination.

Course Goal:
This immunology course is designed to introduce the basic concepts of the immune system in the context of oral health and to relate these principles to vaccine strategies, autoimmune disease, allergy, immunodeficiency disease, transplantation biology and periodontal disease.

Course Objectives:
The student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

  1. the major concepts and paradigms of modern immunology
  2. the components of the innate and adaptive immune systems and how they are functionally interconnected
  3. the genetics, structure and function of antibodies, including the unique aspects of mucosal immunity
  4. the role of T cells and T cell subsets in cell mediated immunity
  5. the role of HLA molecules in normal T lymphocyte cell function and transplantation biology
  6. congenital and acquired immunodeficiency diseases. Immunological aspects of HIV infection.
  7. the basic concepts of vaccines and current strategies for designing vaccines to induce mucosal immunity, including vaccine development for HIV and dental caries
  8. the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and their treatment.
  9. the basis of autoimmune disease, including those of special relevance to clinical practice (Sjogrens, acute rheumatic fever, pemphigus vulgaris )
  10. the role of the adaptive immune response in periodontal disease

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#4. Develop a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, based on the patient’s chief complaint; dental, personal, family, social and medical (systemic disease) history; medical and dental diagnostic tests; and the results of head, neck, oral cavity and radiographic examinations.

#12. Perform risk assessment, determine etiology of dental disease, communicate and demonstrate to patient approaches to modify behaviors contributing to dental disease.

Course Name: Physiology
Course Number: 864
Credits:3
Course Director: Dr. Paul Leavis
Predoctoral Year:1
Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Mon 10:45-12pm, 9-12pm; Tues & Wed 10:45-12pm; Thurs 2:45-4pm/10:45-12pm, Merritt Auditorium
Text(s):
Principles of Physiology, Robert Berne and Mathew Levy, Eds. C. V. Mosby Co.
Grading & Evaluation:
Based upon four examinations

Remediation:
Students at risk are identified early (typically after the first exam) and are strongly encouraged to attend weekly review sessions with course director and other faculty. Student may also be assigned a tutor.

Course Goal:
To cover the functions of mammalian organisms as we understand them at various levels of organization – organ system, organ, cellular and subcellular levels. Our goal is to provide a working knowledge of the fundamental properties and the regulation of these systems so that the student can understand and relate this material to that learned in other basic science courses and to the practice of clinical dentistry. This course is designed to emphasize those aspects of physiology that are of fundamental importance to the maintenance of oral health and the recognition of oral disease while, at the same time, providing a comprehensive background in all areas of physiology.

Course Objectives:
The student is expected to demonstrate an understanding of:

1.The organization of the cell and its organelles with particular emphasis on the structure and function of cell membranes and their role in the control of the transport of solute into and out of the cell. The physical principles of membrane transport including diffusion of uncharged and charged solutes, osmosis, Donnan equilibrium.

2. The mechanisms involved in the generation and maintainance of the nerve impulse including the resting potential, the generation of an action potential, its propagation within a neuron, synaptic transmission. Organization of sensory and motor systems.

3. Mechanics and molecular basis of muscle contraction. Stretch and tension receptors in muscle; stretch reflex, neurophysiology of mastication, TMJ.

4. The cardiovascular system including electrophysiological and mechanical aspects of the cardiac cycle, hemodynamics and circulation, EKG, hemostasis.

5. Physiology of respiration including the mechanics of breathing, pulmonary ventilation/perfusion, gas laws, transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, respiratory control of acid-base balance, control of breathing.

6. Renal function in maintaining the body’s balance of electrolytes, water, hydrogen ions, nutrients- includes glomerular filtration, renal absorption and secretion, counter-current exchange in concentration of urine.

7. Gastro-intestinal physiology including control of gastro-intestinal motility, saliv.ary gland function, nature and control of stomach and pancreatic secretions, the biliary system, digestion and absorption in the small and large intestines.

8. The organization and function of the endocrine system including the synthesis, storage and actions of peptide and steroid hormones, second messenger systems, feedback pathways. Structure of the neuro- and adenohypophysis, thyroid, adrenal, pancreas, parathyroid glands and their hormones.

9. The function of reproductive organs in the female and male including processes of oogenesis and spermatogenesis, hormonal control of female sexual cycles, fertilization, early pregnancy and lactation.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.

#22. Assess and manage patients with uncomplicated craniofacial pain and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

Course Name: Risk Management/Safety/Infection Control Symposium
Course Number: 1238
Credits: 3
Course Director: Ms. Janet Markell
Predoctoral Year: 1, 2, 3
Semester: Winter (Jan-Apr)
Time & Location: Wednesday 8:30am-12pm/Loews Theater

Text(s):
Lecturer’s Handouts

Grading & Evaluation:
Attendance is taken via a scantron sheet.

Remediation:
An audio visual tape is made of the presentation and a CD ROM is available for any individual not present at the symposium.

Course Goals & Objectives:
To inform the dental community of emergency protocols, Code Protocol Facts, Medical Emergency Procedures and Provider Responsibilities, and Your Right to Know for Hazard Communications.

The goal of the symposium is to prepare the student, faculty and staff of the guidelines and procedures to avoid risk within the clinic and to understand the proper protocol for safety.

TUSDM Competency Statements supported by Course

#1. Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality (HIPAA- Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence.

#3. Acquire and understand information in a scientific and effective manner, to assist in critical thinking and problem solving for patient care.